Ateliers de perfectionnement professionnel précongrès

Ateliers précongrès de perfectionnement professionnel : 3 heures/3 crédits de formation continue et 6 heures/6 crédits de formation continue

Il est important que les possibilités de formation offertes par la SCP aient le plus grand impact possible et saisissent toutes les occasions de proposer des sujets d’actualité, fondés sur des données probantes, qui intéressent tous les groupes représentés par la SCP, à savoir les cliniciens, les chercheurs, les enseignants et les étudiants.

À partir de cette année, la SCP n’acceptera plus de propositions d’ateliers précongrès de perfectionnement professionnel. En revanche, notre équipe recherchera activement des intervenants et des thèmes pour la journée de formation précongrès. Nous espérons qu’il en résultera des thématiques plus en phase avec les besoins et les intérêts des membres et des participants.

Le contenu sera toujours basé sur l’innovation et l’information, en mettant l’accent sur sa pertinence pour la recherche, l’enseignement, l’apprentissage et la pratique de la psychologie. Nous adoptons cette nouvelle formule à la suite d’une analyse des tendances en matière de participation aux récents ateliers précongrès, en réponse aux suggestions des membres, et en tenant compte des sujets d’intérêt les plus pertinents.

Les ateliers précongrès de perfectionnement professionnel s’articuleront autour d’un noyau solide de domaines thématiques qui seront proposés chaque année à partir de 2024, ainsi que d’une sélection de possibilités de formation pertinentes et utiles qui seront renouvelées chaque année.

Les suggestions de sujets d’atelier sont toujours les bienvenues – si vous avez une idée de sujet que vous aimeriez voir aborder, veuillez nous en faire part en écrivant à education@cpa.ca.

Les participants pourront toujours s’inscrire aux ateliers précongrès de perfectionnement professionnel de trois heures et de six heures et au programme complet du congrès en une seule transaction.

Membres et étudiants affiliés Non-membres et étudiants non affiliés
Atelier d’une journée complète 399,99 $ 599,99 $
Atelier d’une demi-journée 199,99 $ 299,99 $

Full-Day Workshops


Workshop 1: Advocacy in Action – A Practical Approach to Initiating Change for Psychology – 104441

Presented by: Glenn Brimacombe

Sponsored by:
Continuing Education Credits: 6 CE Credits
Language: English
Duration: 6 Hours (PM) (8:30 – 12:30, 13:30 – 16:00)

Target Audience: Practicing Psychologists, Faculty members in Psychology, Students in Psychology
Skill/Difficulty Level: Introductory
Workshop Description:
This inaugural workshop, led by two experienced individuals who have held many leadership roles in representing psychology at the national and provincial/territorial level, will focus on understanding what advocacy is, why it is important, and how one can advocate for change within the many systems within which psychology works. Building on the foundational elements of advocacy illustrated with practical examples, participants will look to actively apply these skills in group exercises. This workshop is intended for individuals who have no understanding, or a limited understanding of the role and impact that advocacy can have in identifying and moving an issue(s) forward.

Learning Outcomes:

By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  1. Understand the components that underpin advocacy.
  2. Understand why advocacy is an important (strategic) tool in advancing change.
  3. Apply the principles of advocacy in group exercises.

Half-Day Workshops


Half-Day Morning Workshops


Workshop 2: Reconciliation Promotion in the Professional Practice of Psychology – 104437

Presented by: Joshua Madsen, Melanie Nelson, Natasha Wawrykow

Sponsored by: CCPPP
Continuing Education Credits: 3 CE Credits
Language: English
Duration: 3 Hours (AM) (8:30 – 12:00)

Target Audience: Academics, Administrators, and Training Managers in post-secondary education.
Skill/Difficulty Level: Intermediate
Workshop Description:

In 2015, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada issued its final report and an accompanying 94 Calls to Action to redress harms to Indigenous Peoples by colonialism and its sequelae. Meaningful progress in reconciliation is most probable when all groups and individuals commit to relevant goals and actions in their respective spheres of influence. In the discipline of psychology, for example, the leading psychological associations of Western countries with histories of major colonial campaigns have issued documents outlining the harms perpetrated by the profession to Indigenous Peoples (e.g., American Psychological Association, 2023; Australian Psychological Society, 2017; Canadian Psychological Association and the Psychological Foundation of Canada, 2018) as well as remedial actions to address them. In this spirit, the Canadian Psychological Association introduced a new foundational competency, Indigenous Interculturalism, in the newly published Standards of Accreditation. This competency highlights education and training related to working with and for Indigenous people and communities—including incorporation of Indigenous values, worldviews, and practices, and amplification of Indigenous voices to do so—as foundational to the professional practice of psychology. In this workshop, we will discuss the development of the Indigenous Interculturalism competency, its fundamental elements, and its relationship to functional competencies. In addition, we will present a framework for programs to self-assess existing efforts to promote truth and reconciliation and to identify further initiatives that may be undertaken in this spirit. Finally, example initiatives and potentially useful resources will be presented.
Learning Outcomes:

By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the unique circumstances of harm experienced by Indigenous Peoples in Canada, which differ from other historically, persistently, and systemically marginalized groups.
  2. Contrast colonial and Indigenous worldviews and discuss the implications of these differences for the practice of psychology.
  3. Describe how Indigenous Interculturalism, as a foundational competency, relates to functional competencies (e.g., Intervention).
  4. Identify a number of relevant learning resources to further understand Indigenous Interculturalism.
  5. Plan initiatives to incorporate training in Indigenous Interculturalism into psychology programs.

Workshop 3: Psychological Tele-Assessment: A Primer for Curious Psychologists – 104439

Presented by: Chris Pawluk

Sponsored by:
Continuing Education Credits: 3 CE Credits
Language: English
Duration: 3 Hours (AM) (8:30 – 12:00)

Target Audience: Practicing Psychologists, Faculty members in Psychology, Students in Psychology
Skill/Difficulty Level: Introductory
Workshop Description:

The digital era has ushered in transformative changes across various sectors, and psychology is no exception. Dive into a condensed exploration of the realm of virtual psychological assessments, tailored to provide professionals with a foundational understanding of this burgeoning field.

This 3-hour introductory session offers participants a glimpse into the world of virtual assessments, highlighting their importance, benefits, challenges, and the ethical considerations they entail. Through a blend of theoretical insights, real-world examples, and hands-on activities, attendees will gain a comprehensive overview of what it means to conduct assessments in virtual spaces.

Designed as a precursor to our in-depth two-day training, this introductory session serves as both a standalone learning experience and a stepping stone for those keen on delving deeper into the intricacies of virtual psychological assessments.
Learning Outcomes:

By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  1. Understand the foundational concepts and history of virtual psychological assessments.
  2. Identify the primary benefits and challenges associated with conducting assessments in virtual environments.
  3. Recognize key ethical and legal considerations specific to virtual psychological assessments.
  4. Engage in a hands-on demonstration that showcases the practical aspects of virtual assessments.
  5. Evaluate the relevance and importance of transitioning to virtual assessment methods in contemporary psychology.

Workshop 4: Providing Psychology Services with Indigenous Peoples in the Era of Truth and Reconciliation, and the Final Report of the National Inquiry into MMIWG. – 104440

Presented by: Jennifer Chalmers

Sponsored by:
Continuing Education Credits: 3 CE Credits
Language: English
Duration: 3 Hours (AM) (8:30 – 12:00)

Target Audience: All persons engaging in practice of psychology
Skill/Difficulty Level: Introductory
Workshop Description:

This workshop aims to provide a current context and setting for sharing knowledge and considerations of what it means to practice ethically in the era of Truth and Reconciliation, 94 Calls to Action (TRC) and 231 Calls to Justice (MMIWG). Psychology practitioners and students from settings such as health, education, justice and corrections, child and youth, and all persons involved in advocacy will find this workshop helpful in remaining current and being part of the growing support for the health and well-being of Canada’s First Peoples.

This workshop will explore core knowledge for ethical practice according to the Canadian Code of Ethics and provincial/territorial standards of psychology practice in working with First Nations, Métis and Inuit.  Content in this workshop is in addition to existing cultural-sensitivity and diversity training that are emerging in many jurisdictions. Messages from institutions, employers and all levels of provincial and territorial care do talk of truth and reconciliation, and acknowledgement of lands and histories, both past and present. As mobilization in the public continues in response to reconciliation with Indigenous Peoples, so too does the need for professions such as psychology to look in the mirror, engage in new learning and in many circumstances, engage in re-learning and training.

This workshop will explore current realities and challenges facing psychologists and students, what are ethical practices, how to use current psychology resources such as the CPA Code of Ethics and the Sixth Revision of the CPA Accreditation Standards, including the foundational competency in working with Indigenous Peoples.

The workshop will provide participants with emerging knowledge in the practice of psychology with First Nations, Métis and Inuit People, skill development in bringing personal humility to psychology practice, and the responsibilities of psychology to be self-reflective. All are welcome, psychology students and residents, practitioners, educators/training personnel, researchers, and advocacy, and all who are interested in the health and well-being of the First Peoples of Canada.
Learning Outcomes:

  1. Explore current issues impacting the delivery of psychology services in First Nations, Métis and Inuit communities, from coast to coast to coast.
  2. Review strategic messages for psychology from the last 30 years of public works: Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples (RCAP- 1996), Aboriginal Healing Foundation Three Pillars of Healing (AHF- 1998-2014), Truth and Reconciliation Commission Report/94 Calls to Action (2015), Acting on the 231 Calls to Justice- Final Report from the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls and 2SLGBTQQIA+ People (2019) and others.
  3. Review and situate current psychological service delivery with the CPA code of Ethics, and the foundational competency of working with First Nations, Métis and Inuit, as outlined in the sixth edition of the CPA Accreditation Standards.
  4. Explore participants current practices (all examples welcomed) from coast to coast to coast, to share successes and challenges among workshop participants. Sample works will be provided to be used in small group work.
  5. Review evidence-based psychology services (assessment, therapy and counselling, community), and what it means to say yes to quality service delivery, when/where to say no, and all the grey areas between yes and no.
  6. Engage participants in group learning of the methods and ways of bringing personal humility and self-examination in working with First Nations, Métis and Inuit clients, groups and communities.

 


Half-Day Afternoon Workshops


Workshop 5: Increasing Trust in the Workplace via Indigenous Workways – 99501

Presented by: Wendi Adair, Leanne Gosse, Catherine Kwantes

Sponsored by: Industrial and Organizational Psychology
Continuing Education Credits: 3 CE Credits
Language: English
Duration: 3 Hours (PM) (13:30 – 16:00)

Target Audience: HR Managers, Academics, Students in Psychology
Skill/Difficulty Level: Intermediate
Workshop Description:

In this workshop participants will be guided through modules of the Indigenous Workways Toolkit, an employee training program developed in response to TRC’s Call to Action 92 that asks Corporate

Canada to make space for Indigenous employees. Indigenous Workways, a collaboration between University of Windsor, University of Waterloo, and Conestoga College, heard from Indigenous students, alumni, and employees about their workplace experiences and expectations, focusing on building trust.

The toolkit brings Indigenous worldviews, experiences, and voices to Western psychological and organizational theory addressing organizational trust, interpersonal trust, and networks of trust. Topics covered in the workshop also include holistic conflict resolution, relational communication, and mitigating microaggressions. The workshop teaches the basics of the relevant psychological construct, how it may manifest for Indigenous employees, and strategies to navigate cultural differences and create a space where Indigenous voices are valued and heard. The toolkit will empower employees with new knowledge and skills to build trust and forge strong relationships with Indigenous employees. The workshop includes real-life examples, practical insights from research by the Indigenous Workways project, and valuable resources to support employees’ learning journey.
Learning Outcomes:

By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  1. recognize and address the common challenges faced by Indigenous employees in workplace conflict situations, applying culturally inclusive strategies to foster effective conflict resolution and actively contributing to cultivating strong relationships that enhance trust and collaboration within the workplace.
  2. Be knowledgeable about Indigenous employees’ experiences with workplace microaggressions, understand their impact on well-being, and take action to address this phenomenon.
  3. Recognize relational communication styles and facilitate relational communication with Indigenous coworkers and others at work.