PRESENTATION TYPES FOR CPA2021 (VIRTUAL)

The CPA’s 2021 Virtual Event will feature multiple presentations of varying presentation type.  These include:

  1. Workshops (of varying duration and varying eligibility for Continuing Education credits, including 6-hour, 3-hour, and 85-minute Workshops)
  2. Spoken Individual Presentations (of varying duration, including 5-minute Snapshots, 12-minute talks, 25-minute Conversation Session, and 25-minute Theory Review Sessions)
  3. Spoken Group Presentations (of varying duration, including 55-minute panel discussions and 55-minute symposia)
  4. Posters
  5. Skills Development Workshops

See below for more information on each of these presentation types, including descriptions and submission requirements.


WORKSHOPS

The CPA’s 2021 Virtual Event will feature three types of workshops offered during the month of June:

  1. 6-Hour/6 CE Credits Professional Development Workshops
  2. 3-Hour/3 CE Credits Professional Development Workshops
  3. 85-minute Workshops (some CE eligible)

Professional Development Workshops: 3-Hour/3-CE credit and 6-hour/6-CE credit

The presenter of a Professional Development Workshop (PDW) – whether a 6-hour/6-CE or 3-hour/3-CE workshop – is typically a senior expert in the topic area; submissions by a novice just entering a topic area will not be considered.

A PDW is not intended for presenting new empirical research.

PDWs are presented by an individual or a group, and are intended to have a clearly defined practical, experiential, and/or demonstrational component. PDWs are intended to be participatory events where delegates engage and interact with each other. Led by a presenter or presenters with widely acknowledged expertise and experience in the topic area, each workshop should focus on ensuring that participants leave the workshop with 3-6 tangible new skills, tools, and/or techniques (i.e., learning outcomes). Thus, good PDWs are innovative, interactive, inclusive, integrative, developmental, provocative, logistically sound, and provide both novice and experienced psychologists with an opportunity to continue their professional development.

The CPA has traditionally made use of edited video recordings of Pre-Convention Workshop sessions as the basis for its online Continuing Professional Development (CPD) content for CPA members and other behavioural science professionals. In the absence of this option, we plan to use recordings from PDWs to create this content. The content from your presentation will only be turned into one of the CPA’s online CPD offerings with your consent. As such, presenters will be asked to indicate their preference for delivery:

6-hour/6 CE credit PDWs

  1. Live delivery of the Workshop session only, in two 3-hour increments with no recording
  2. Live delivery of the Workshop session in two 3-hour increments with recording that will be developed into CPD

In addition, presenters should decide whether they wish to deliver the two sessions on the same day or on separate days.

3-hour/3 CE credit PDWs

  1. Live delivery of the Workshop session only, with no recording
  2. Live delivery of the Workshop session with recording that will be developed into CPD

CPD credit for both live and recorded formats is granted at 1 credit per instructional hour, exclusive of breaks.

The CPA will provide an honorarium to presenters on a per PDW basis (i.e., not per presenter) for those workshops that are converted to an online CPD offering on the CPA’s education platform. Additional funding may be available from a CPA Section. To inquire about additional sponsorship for your PDW, please contact the appropriate CPA Section(s) at: https://cpa.ca/aboutcpa/cpasections/

Workshop (85 minutes)

Workshops, 85-minutes in duration, are presented by an individual or a group with widely acknowledged expertise and experience in the topic area.

Workshops are intended to have a clearly defined practical, experiential, and/or demonstrational component; they are also intended to be participatory events where delegates engage and interact with each other. Each workshop should focus on ensuring that participants leave the workshop with at least 3 tangible new skills, tools, and/or techniques (i.e., learning outcomes). Thus, good Workshops are innovative, interactive, inclusive, integrative, developmental, provocative, logistically sound, and provide both novice and experienced psychologists with an opportunity to continue their professional development.

CE Credits may be available if applicable. Conversion to CPD may also be possible.


SPOKEN INDIVIDUAL PRESENTATIONS

Snapshots (5-minutes):

The Snapshot is a method for sharing information in a spoken/visual format in a succinct manner, creating interest in a project or program, and promoting networking amongst delegates. A Snapshot can be used for presenting a high-level overview of one’s empirical research, program, intervention, or the need/impact for/of a policy.

Each Snapshot is allocated a total of 5-minutes, and each is permitted a maximum of 3 slides. To be effective, a Snapshot presentation needs to focus on what is critical, and it needs to be delivered in a stimulating and thought-provoking manner.

A submission for a Snapshot should include the following information: the rationale for the study/studies or program/policy or intervention; the method of the study/studies or the approach employed for the program/policy or evaluation; a summary of analyses, results and conclusions; and an overview of actions, recommendations, or impacts that occurred or that will be implemented or evaluated.

12-Minute Talk (12-minutes):

The 12-Minute Talk format is intended for delivering a detailed presentation about a series (more than 2) of empirical studies or a complex program or intervention.

Each 12-minute Talk is allocated 10-minutes for presentation and 3-minutes for questions. This format is reserved for sharing information about a complex issue, series of studies or an involved program or intervention.

A submission for a 12-Minute Talk should include the following information: the empirical and theoretical context and rationale for the studies or program/policy or intervention; the general method of the studies or the approach employed for the program/policy or evaluation; a summary of analyses, results and conclusions; and an overview of actions, recommendations, or impacts that occurred or that will be implemented or evaluated.

All 12-Minute Talk submissions will be grouped into sessions that are organized around a specific theme or topic area. To ensure that each 12-Minute Talk submission is included in an appropriate thematic session, each submission must include informative descriptors.

Conversation Sessions (25-minutes):

A Conversation Session is intended for sharing, exploring and stimulating thoughts and ideas about an issue/topic/case, a program or intervention, or for brainstorming alternative approaches to research, practice, education, and/or policies.

Each Conversation Session is submitted by a leader who is expected to provide a clear but brief summary (15 minutes maximum) of the core issues, ideas or approaches, interventions, etc. to be shared and explored. In addition, the leader is expected to inspire participants into sharing and engaging with the forum topic (minimum 10 minutes).

A submission for a Conversation Session must include the following: a statement of the critical issues, ideas or approaches, interventions, etc. to be shared and explored; a statement of why these issues, ideas, etc. are of current interest and appropriate for brainstorming; and a description of methods to be used for encouraging participants to share and engage with the forum topic and with each other.

Conversation Session submissions intended for presenting/discussing empirical research will not be considered.

Review Session (25-minutes):

The focus of a Review Session is the discussion of a theory, method or analysis.

This type of presentation is not for presenting new empirical research. The presenter is normally a senior expert in the area; submissions by a novice just entering the area will not be accepted.

Review Sessions are intended for the review of one or more theoretical perspective(s) or for the synthesis of different theoretical perspectives. This type of submission is not for presenting new empirical research. The presenter is normally a senior expert in the area; submissions by a novice just entering the area will not be accepted. Three presentations may be grouped together in a single session, with a moderator for keeping the session on schedule.


SPOKEN GROUP PRESENTATIONS

Panel Discussion (55-minutes):

A Panel Discussion is a live or virtual discussion of a specific topic amongst a selected group of panelists who share differing perspectives.  It includes a brief introduction and then discussion amongst the panelists and if live, the audience.

The panel is typically facilitated by a “moderator” who guides the panel and the audience through the discussion. It typically involves 3-4 experts in the field, who share facts, offer opinions and respond to audience questions either through questions curated by the moderator or taken from the audience directly.

A panel is NOT: a set of presentations, one after another; a one-on-one interview with each panelist; just a Q&A from the audience.

A submission for a Panel Discussion must include the following: an overall abstract of the discussion topic that addresses what makes the topic novel, contentious or pertinent for discussion; name/affiliation/role of the moderator and statement to their qualifications to moderate the session; the names/affiliations/roles of up to four panelists and a clear statement for each panelist on the unique perspective they will be bring to the discussion.

Symposium (55-minutes):

A Symposium is a format for delivering a series of Spoken Presentations that focus on the same topic. Each symposium is expected to include a moderator/convenor (10 minutes); overall title and abstract; and 3 papers (10 minutes each) each with an accompanying title and abstract. Symposium convenors have the option of including a Discussant.

Each symposium is created and submitted by one person, called the symposium moderator (or convenor). The moderator/convenor can function in one of three manners: moderator/convenor/ only, presenter of one of the Spoken Presentations, or symposium discussant. Symposia presenters can be from the same or different countries.

A submission for a symposium must include the following:

  1. an overall abstract of the symposium with the following information: a brief description of the symposium topic; a statement of what makes this topic novel, contentious, or pertinent to the convention; and a clear statement of how each presenter will offer a unique approach/perspective to the proposed topic.
  2. for each presenter – an abstract with the same information as required for a Spoken Presentation submission (empirical and theoretical context and rationale for the study or program/policy or intervention; the general method of the study or the approach employed for the program/policy or evaluation; a summary of the issue or analyses/, results/ conclusions; and an overview of actions, recommendations, or impacts that occurred or that will be implemented or evaluated).

Please note: The symposium moderator (or convenor) is responsible for the engagement and a productive experience for panel members and the audience. The moderator/convenor should arrange at least one meeting, in person, by phone or electronically, among the panel members prior to the convention and the symposium. On the day of the symposium, the moderator/convenor is responsible for managing the allotted time (55 minutes) and makes sure that the symposium begins on time and each panelist has an equitable share of the available time. The moderator/convenor also ensures that at least 15 minutes of the symposium time is set aside for conversation with the members of the audience and that the panel ends at the allotted time.


POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Poster

Posters — in print format — are the most appropriate and efficient method for presenting empirical research. A poster title should inform one about the results of a study or studies or speak to the effectiveness or impact of a policy/program or intervention.

Posters should make use of pictures and diagrams, and they should use words/text sparingly.

A submission for a poster presentation should include the following information: the rationale for the study/studies or program/policy or intervention; the method of the study/studies or the approach employed for the program/policy; a summary of analyses or evaluations that were conducted; a summary of the results and the conclusions that follow from them; and an overview of actions, recommendations, or impacts that were made, implemented or evaluated.

If accepted, posters may be submitted with a voice-over narration of 5-10 minutes duration. Voice-over narration is not mandatory.

Information on the orientation of the posters (portrait; landscape), size of the posters, etc. will be provided upon acceptance of a submission.


SKILLS DEVELOPMENT SESSIONS

Knowledge Translation in Action (5-minutes):

New this year, the CPA is inviting submissions to be considered for inclusion in a select number of specific skills development sessions that will focus on teaching individuals how to succinctly present their work and its relevance to different stakeholders such as Government Officials, Media, and Funders.

There will be a limited number of these sessions, and as such only a limited number of submissions will be accepted.  Accepted submitters will be grouped and given 5 minutes to speak to the relevance of their work to the session’s assigned mentor.  Mentors will provide feedback on how to strengthen their “pitch” whether for financial support, media coverage, policy change, etc.

A submission for this session must include the following information: the rationale for the study/studies or program/policy or intervention; the method of the study/studies or the approach employed for the program/policy; a summary of analyses or evaluations that were conducted; a summary of the results and the conclusions that follow from them; an overview of the relevance of the work to various decision-makers; a statement indicating how the submitter would most benefit from this opportunity.