Pre-Convention PD Workshops

See below for the Pre-Convention PD workshops being offered as part of the CPA’s 2022 annual convention and register now to attend.

Pre-Convention PD Workshops are scheduled to take place on June 16th. These workshops will be 3-hours or 6-hours in duration for corresponding CE credits. A separate registration system and fee, over and apart from the CPA’s convention registration system and fee, will be required.

The CPA reserves the right to cancel any Pre-Convention Workshops due to low registration. In the event that this should happen, registrants can register for another workshop or be reimbursed their payment.

Workshop Fees

Early Bird Rate* Regular Rate*
3 Hour Workshop Student Rate $100.00 $125.00
  Student Non-Affiliate Rate $130.00 $150.00
  CPA Member/Fellow Rate $150.00 $250.00
  Non-Member Rate $175.00 $275.00
6 Hour Workshop Student Rate $190.00 $225.00
  CPA Student Non-Affiliate Rate $230.00 $250.00
  CPA Member/Fellow Rate $300.00 $400.00
  Non-Member Rate $325.00 $450.00

* Early Bird rates are available until May 15th, 2022. Regular rates apply from May 16th on.


Register for Workshop #1

Workshop #1: Developing Sustainable Program Leadership: Creating Manuals for Directors and Identifying Common Challenges (71632)

Presented by: Susan Vandermorris, Amanda Maranzan, Sara Hagstrom, Lesley Lutes, Diane LaChapelle, Patricia Furer, Brad Hallam, Emily Piper

Sponsored by: CCPPP
Continuing Education Credits:3 CE Credits
Language:English
Duration: 3 Hours (AM) (8:30 – 12:00)

Target Audience:training directors of both university training programs and internship/residency sites as well as other psychologists who are interested in entering these roles in the future.
Skill/Difficulty Level:Intermediate
Workshop Description:

Training directors of graduate- and residency-level professional psychology training programs manage a vast array of policies and procedures. Substantial knowledge is consolidated in the experience of current directors, leaving programs vulnerable should their directors leave the role unexpectedly. The primary purpose of this workshop is to share resources and take steps to develop Director Manuals for our programs. Our goal is to create program-specific Director Manuals that outline the responsibilities and timelines that directors follow, as well as the resources they use. Manuals will include common core materials as well as program-specific components. Workshop presenters will share sample Tables of Contents, which include topics such as duties, timelines, general and clinical training issues, and administration, and financial issues. Small group discussions will help participants identify which components of the manual are already available within their programs and which need to be developed. Attendees should bring existing documents from their programs to allow for work on their own manuals as well as sharing of resources. Common challenges and opportunities in supporting sustainable leadership of academic and internship programs will be explored.

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Identify core and program-specific components of a manual for training directors
  2. Share sample manual components across programs.
  3. Create or refine their own manual.
  4. Discuss common challenges and opportunities in supporting sustainable leadership of academic and internship programs.

Workshop #2: Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) in adults with chronic health conditions: Prevalence, problems and possibilities (71760) CANCELLED

Presented by: Dennis Pusch, Keith Dobson, Chantelle Klassen

Sponsored by: Health Psychology and Behavioural Medicine
Continuing Education Credits:3 CE Credits
Language:English
Duration: 3 Hours (PM) (13:00 – 16:30)

Target Audience:Clinicians, graduate students, other health care professionals
Skill/Difficulty Level:Intermediate
Workshop Description:

Chronic diseases have been growing in prevalence in Canada. 44% of adults now have at least one of ten common chronic conditions, such as hypertension, diabetes, heart disease, etc. (Public Health Agency of Canada, 2019), with a further 33% prevalence of multimorbidity (Geda, Janzen & Pahwa, 2021). Traumatic childhood experiences are clearly potent predictors of chronic disease in adults (Felitti, Anda et al., 1998), but comparatively little has been done to translate our awareness of the link between early trauma and later chronic illness into treatment approaches for adults who may be at risk of developing, or already have, chronic conditions. In this workshop, participants will learn about the relationship between adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and poor health outcomes later in life, including the various pathways through which ACEs are thought to exert their impact. Research data from 4,000+ primary care patients in Calgary, Alberta will be presented, including the effective use of treatment protocols with adults who report high-ACE scores. Strategies for meaningful ACEs screening will be discussed, and an evidence-based rationale for addressing ACEs in chronic disease populations will be presented. Specific treatment techniques related to increasing resilience, emotional self-management, self-care and interpersonal effectiveness will be demonstrated.

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Attendees will be able to articulate at least three pathways by which Adverse Childhood Experiences contribute to chronic conditions in adults
  2. Qualified attendees will be able to adminster ACEs screening to adults with chronic conditions in a competent and compassionate manner
  3. Attendees will be able to articulate an effective treatment rationale for adults with chronic conditions who have also experienced 3 or more ACEs
  4. Qualified attendees will be ready to use specific intervention strategies to increase resilience, emotional coping, self-care, and interpersonal effectiveness

Workshop #3: Justice, Equity, Diversity And Inclusion (JEDI) In Canadian School Psychology: Why, Who, And How (71184) CANCELLED

Presented by: Maria Kokai, Ester Cole

Sponsored by: N/A
Continuing Education Credits:3 CE Credits
Language:English
Duration: 3 Hours (AM) (8:30 – 12:00)

Target Audience:Practicing psychologists, academics, those involved in psychology graduate training programs, those who supervise, graduate students
Skill/Difficulty Level:Intermediate
Workshop Description:

This interactive workshop is designed to strengthen much needed roadmaps for services during the prolonged COVID-19 recovery and beyond. Methods: It will utilize an integrated 3×4 matrix as a model that applies evidence-based JEDI services applicable to diverse school communities in the context of the national mosaic. Results: Based on the review of current national and international professional literature/research, the application of the model’s two-dimensional framework delineates evolving service goals on a continuum in the face of growing mental health needs, as well as the 4 levels of service recipients in educational systems. Conclusions: The applicability of the model is wide ranging, which will be illustrated through examples pertaining to mental health and academic achievements; social-emotional learning that promotes resiliency; meeting the needs of immigrant and refugee students; crisis intervention, and violence prevention. Each of the workshop examples will be accompanied by ‘user-friendly’ tools and resources. Action/Impact: The application of the model is recommended to strengthen roadmaps for services; enhance the reach and effectiveness of preservice and in-service school psychology professionals, in order to meet the ever-growing needs for just, equitable, diverse and inclusive services for children, youth and their families.

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Strengthening core consultation skills to be utilized for professional advocacy at all educational levels, including multidisciplinary support teams.
  2. Enhancing planning skills to facilitate collaborative partnerships with educational leaders and families in order to flexibly adjust and monitor efficacy of interventions.
  3. Strengthening training ethical competencies for supervision of practicum, internship and practice in academia and field levels.
  4. Embedding principles of Social Justice and EDI competencies to consultation and assessment for intervention with Newcomers in direct and mediated school services.
  5. Identifying gaps and growth promoting opportunities for pre-service and in-service concerning the 4 levels of racism impacting students throughout their learning trajectory.

Workshop #4: Exploring Your Options in Mental Health Professions after Graduating with your Psychology Degree (71954) CANCELLED

Presented by: Saeid Chavoshi

Sponsored by: N/A
Continuing Education Credits:3 CE Credits
Language:English
Duration: 3 Hours (PM) (13:00 – 16:30)

Target Audience:Undergraduate Students
Skill/Difficulty Level:Introductory
Workshop Description:

Are you a student interested in working in the mental health fields. Join us for a pre-convention workshop to learn about the different pathways available to you from a panel of professionals. We will also specifically discuss the clinical psychology pathway. Applying to Clinical Psychology can be a confusing and challenging process. We will break down the process and discuss what it takes to be an outstanding applicant at each application step, including GPA, GREs, Reference Letters, CV, Statement of Interest, and the Interview. Topics that will be covered include: – Clinical Psychology: Who should apply and What makes an application successful. – PsyD Programs: What are they and how they differ from PhD Clinical Programs – Registered Psychotherapist & Registered Social Worker: Differences from Clinical Psychology and their pathways – Other career considerations: Occupational Therapy, Child and Youth Worker, and Psychometrist.

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Using the Education-Licensure-Practice Model to envision career development in the mental health professions
  2. Clinical Psychology: Who should apply and What makes an application successful.
  3. Registered Psychotherapist & Registered Social Worker: Differences from Clinical Psychology and their pathways
  4. Other career considerations: Occupational Therapy, Child and Youth Worker, and Psychometrist
  5. PsyD Programs: What are they and how they differ from PhD Clinical Programs

Workshop #5: Applying the Core Components of Inclusive Education (CCIE) in Transforming General Education Classroom into an Inclusive Setting (71651) CANCELLED

Presented by: Asma Batool

Sponsored by: N/A
Continuing Education Credits:3 CE Credits
Language:English
Duration: 3 Hours (PM) (13:00 – 16:30)

Target Audience:Researchers, graduate students, educational practitioners (K-12 teachers, administrators), and policymakers
Skill/Difficulty Level:Intermediate
Workshop Description:

 

The growing learner variability in the classrooms demands a need for the educational practitioners’ training in acquiring comprehensive skills on how to recognize variability and identify barriers to learning that co-exist and need to be addressed in achieving an inclusive learning setting. The underlying objectives of this workshop are to contribute to the researchers’ and K-12 teachers’ theoretical and experiential knowledge about the core inclusive education practices; alongside teaching them on-ground research-based skills on how to apply inclusive education models in diverse classrooms. Thus, benefiting various types of learners and initiating an inclusive learning environment in the general education classrooms. This workshop provides learning opportunities and valuable resources to the classroom/subject teachers, instructional resource teachers, paraprofessionals, teaching assistants, administrators, policymakers and researchers, to learn the essential knowledge and skills required in anticipating variability and barriers to learning and how to intentionally align curricula and teaching practices to the core components of inclusive education. In sum, the workshop outcomes are expected to enhance participants’ conceptual knowledge about disability and inclusion, gather resources to support classrooms, and learn ways how to scale school districts to promote inclusion.

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Increasing the conceptual knowledge and enhancing positive beliefs about inclusive education (from the classroom through the school district level & policy making)
  2. Providing various resources to improve participants’ skills to incorporate inclusive practices in the classrooms
  3. Learning the core components/parameters of inclusive education that are considered critical in the educational research and practices
  4. Providing ways to the educational practitioners how to align curricula with the research-based core components of inclusive education
  5. Introducing “Recognizing Learner Variability/Differences” and learning ways to celebrate/accept difference
  6. Learning ways and strategies to deal with different kinds of barriers

Register for Workshop #6

Workshop #6: Indigenous approaches to complex trauma and clinical practice (71352)

Presented by: Karlee Fellner

Sponsored by: Counselling Psychology
Continuing Education Credits:3 CE Credits
Language:English
Duration: 3 Hours (PM) (13:00 – 16:30)

Target Audience:Clinicians, graduate students, educators
Skill/Difficulty Level:Introductory
Workshop Description:

 

This workshop offers concrete strategies in response to the CPA and PFC’s Task Force Report on addressing the Truth and Reconciliation Commission in psychology (2018). Participants will learn about integrating Indigenous ways of knowing, being, and doing into psychotherapy and trauma work, with a focus on case conceptualization and interventions. Drawing on ground breaking theory and practice in decolonizing and Indigenizing therapy and trauma, this workshop offers approaches that address intergenerational and vicarious influences on people’s experiences, with an emphasis on complex trauma. These approaches deconstruct conventional Eurocentric conceptualizations of trauma-as pathology, instead honouring experiences as intergenerational and collective conversations that guide people, families, and communities toward wellness, balance, and social and environmental justice. Such approaches honour survivance, including the ancestral, collective, and personal knowledges and wisdom that emerge through difficult and traumatic experiences. Attendees will learn how to bring an “all my relations,” land-based, strength-based, culturally responsive, holistic, and historically sensitive approach to their therapeutic work through land-based interventions grounded in Indigenous knowings. This workshop actively engages participants in experiential learning to support application to practice.

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Understanding of complex, direct, historical, intergenerational, colonial, ancestral, and vicarious trauma, and how these apply to clinical practice with Indigenous people;
  2. Understanding of the concepts of survivance and trauma wisdom in the context of case conceptualization, treatment planning, and interventions;
  3. Basic understanding of Indigenous approaches to psychotherapy and how they may be integrated into therapeutic practice through observing proper protocols and working with community Elders and knowledge holders;
  4. Basic understanding of how to engage with Indigenous communities in a good way through observing proper protocols.

Workshop #7: Becoming an Intentional Therapist: Self-Care for Female Clinicians (70413) CANCELLED

Presented by: Melissa Tiessen, Karen Dyck

Sponsored by: N/A
Continuing Education Credits:6 CE Credits
Language:English
Duration: 6 Hours (AM/PM) (09:00-16:30)

Target Audience:Female clinicians
Skill/Difficulty Level:Introductory
Workshop Description:

Self-care has been shown to have a positive impact on psychologists’ health and wellness and has also been shown to affect professional functioning, including patient outcomes (Maranzan et. al, 2018). The importance of self-care for psychologists is further emphasized by its’ inclusion in the Canadian Code of Ethics for Psychologists (CPA, 2017). Yet, psychologists have historically received minimal or no formal training in the area of self-care and, as a result, are often unaware of the specific aspects of the work that can contribute to challenges in this regard. Self-care is further complicated for female psychologists due to the ongoing societal messages women receive regarding their primary role as “carers” and the expectation that others’ needs be put ahead of their own. This workshop is designed specifically for female clinicians interested in better understanding and enhancing their current selfcare practices.

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Attendees will be able to identify common factors impacting female clinicians’ wellness and self-care.
  2. Attendees will have a framework for evaluating their own self-care practices.
  3. Attendees will have a more compassionate awareness of their personal self-care roadblocks.
  4. Attendees will have a concrete plan and accountability to make incremental improvements in their current self-care practices.

Workshop #8: The use of exposure with response prevention for addressing negative body image behavior in patients with an eating disorder: Fixing, checking, and social comparison (71213) CANCELLED

Presented by: Brad MacNeil

Sponsored by: N/A
Continuing Education Credits:3 CE Credits
Language:English
Duration: 3 Hours (AM) (8:30 – 12:00)

Target Audience:Clinicians and graduate students
Skill/Difficulty Level:Intermediate
Workshop Description:

Body satisfaction has been well-established as an important variable in the maintenance, lapse and relapse processes of anorexia and bulimia nervosa. Exposure with response prevention (ERP) is an evidence-based approach with documented efficacy that is not routinely employed by outpatient eating disorder treatment providers. The purpose of this workshop is to teach current best practices in the application of ERP to address negative body image behaviour including fixing/checking, avoidance, and social comparison. Participants will have a renewed appreciation for the importance of addressing body dissatisfaction as part of a comprehensive outpatient treatment plan. Specific competencies reviewed include behavior theory, principles of exposure, STOP strategies for response prevention, and delivery of ERP in virtual formats. Additional competencies include ERP hierarchy design, therapy process in the virtual domain, and effective timing of ERP as an adjunct to core evidence-based treatments (e.g., family-based therapy, cognitive behavior therapy – enhanced) to maximize patient outcomes and user experience. Participants will leave equipped with behavioral competencies to apply ERP in their setting.

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Participants will learn about the theoretical underpinnings of exposure with response prevention (ERP) in addressing negative body image behavior.
  2. Participants will gain skills in the design of ERP hierarchies.
  3. Participants will learn how to collaboratively set effective between session home actions with patients.
  4. Participants will learn how to use behavioral experiments to challenge negative body image beliefs.
  5. Participants will learn how to adapt ERP for delivery in a telepsychology format.

Workshop #9: Core competencies for psychologists in understanding and managing vaccine and needle pain, fear, and fainting across the lifespan (72348) CANCELLED

Presented by: Presented by: C. Meghan McMurtry

Sponsored by: N/A
Continuing Education Credits:3 CE Credits
Language:English
Duration: 3 Hours (AM) (8:30 – 12:00)

Target Audience:Clinicians and graduate students
Skill/Difficulty Level:Introductory
Workshop Description:

The majority of children, half of adolescents, and 20-30% of adults have some needle fear; one in 10 individuals are so afraid of needles that it causes avoidance and impairment. Widespread vaccine uptake is critical to the COVID-19 pandemic and vaccine hesitancy is one of the top threats to global health. Needle-related fears are a known contributor to vaccine hesitancy. Needle fears also contribute to avoidance in other areas of healthcare where needles are commonly used to prevent, diagnose, monitor, and treat conditions. Psychology professionals have a key role in supporting vaccine uptake and healthcare by addressing needle-related fears through evidence-based interventions. This workshop will provide a cutting-edge summary of the substantive literature on needle-related pain and fear management across the lifespan. Systematic reviews and clinical practice guidelines will be presented, emphasizing practical advice for clinicians and students. Concepts of pain, fear, anxiety, phobia, vasovagal syncope, and immunization stress-related responses will be defined and distinguished. The speakers, nationally and internationally recognized experts in needle-related pain and fear, will share their personal experience in assessment, and intervention development and delivery in an accessible and engaging way. Attendees will leave knowing how to make needles as comfortable as possible.

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Describe the consequences of unmanaged fear and pain from needle procedures in childhood
  2. Define pain, fear, anxiety, vasovagal syncope, and immunization stress related responses
  3. Identify evidence-based pain, low fear, and fainting management strategies for needles across the lifespan
  4. Discuss exposure-based strategies for the reduction of high levels of needle fear across the lifespan
  5. Identify evidence-based knowledge translation products for needle-related pain and fear including CARD

Workshop #10: InterCom Project – Part 1: Social Changes and Collective Values: Getting Better by Being Involved! – Part 2: Understanding Social Change: Getting Better with Benevolence (71776) CANCELLED

Presented by: Emmanuelle Ayotte, Camille Bourdeau, France Landry, Roxane de la Sablonnière

Sponsored by: N/A
Continuing Education Credits:6 CE Credits
Language:English
Duration: 6 Hours (AM/PM) (09:00-16:30)

Target Audience:Everyone over the age of 12
Skill/Difficulty Level:Introductory
Workshop Description:

Part 1: The COVID-19 pandemic can be understood as a dramatic social change (DSC). DSC generates an abrupt rupture in social infrastructures such as, for example, school closures. It can disrupt social norms which in turn can modify behaviors such as social distancing. Furthermore, a DSC can threaten personal identity and values. The impact of COVID-19 surpasses the individual level, altering interpersonal interactions, social norms, and collective well-being across the world. Understanding the COVID-19 pandemic as a DSC is thus essential for clinical psychologists and researchers in order to understand its impact on interactions between individuals and overcome these consequences. This workshop is based upon scientific literature, empirical evidence, and is constructed under positive psychology and social psychology perspectives. It was built by researchers, clinical psychologists directed by France Landry, PhD, and students in partnership with and for teenagers and young adults.

Part 2: COVID-19 pandemic can be understood as a dramatic social change (DSC). As shown in the 1st workshop, DSC generates an abrupt rupture in social infrastructures, disrupts social norms, and threatens the individuals’ identity. COVID-19’s impacts surpass the individual level, altering interpersonal interactions, social norms, and collective well-being across the world. Self-compassion and benevolence were found to promote well-being in DSC such as COVID-19 by buffering its devastating psychosocial consequences. Developing collective interventions using these concepts is promising to develop collective resilience. This workshop is based on scientific literature, empirical evidence, and is constructed under positive psychology and social psychology perspectives. It was built by researchers, clinical psychologists directed by France Landry, PhD, and students in partnership with and for teenagers and young adults.

Learning Outcomes:
Part 1:

  1. Stimulate reflection on the COVID-19’s impacts on mental health;
  2. Deepen understanding of DSCs;
  3. Identify the collective values of participants to embody them and promote personal and collective well-being.

Part 2:

  1. Develop strategies to promote self-compassion and benevolence in order to favor personal and collective well-being;
  2. Deepen understanding of the concept of shared humanity;
  3. Share these strategies with a next of kin.

Workshop #11: INTEROCEPTION: It’s as plain as the nose on your face. (70859) CANCELLED

Presented by: Bea MacKay

Sponsored by: N/A
Continuing Education Credits:3 CE Credits
Language:English
Duration: 3 Hours (AM) (8:30 – 12:00)

Target Audience:Students of counseling and psychotherapy as well as participants new to

counselling.
Skill/Difficulty Level:Advanced
Workshop Description:

What: Teach Neuro-science of Interoception: Processing sensations and how to shift from managing to processing. How: Accessing sensations and breathing through the waves. How: Lecturettes, Demonstration, Experience as therapist and clients. Lisa Feldman Barrett published “How Emotions are Made: the secret life of the brain.” In 2017. In this book she explains the concept of Interoception – a mind/body process that creates the sensations humans experience. She terms it “affect” and states it’s not emotion. In the presenter’s own therapeutic experience and in her work with clients, she links the sensations to processing emotions effectively, healing trauma (current and PTSD), handling emotional pain and facilitating personal growth by creating new neural pathways. It’s all about the sensations regardless of meaning, that is, one does not NEED TO KNOW/UNDERSTAND why, what, how, when, where they were create “Lose your mind and come to your senses.” Fritz would be tickled pink! Interoception will be taught through lecturettes alternating with experiential sessions. Participants are given the opportunity to integrate theory with practice by working in dyads on their own sensations under supervision and direction of the presenter. Plenty of time for debriefing, discussion and questions is provided.

Learning Outcomes:

  1. A brief overview of Neuro-science: Left Brain/Right Brain+body
  2. Overview of Introception: how sensations are produced by human body and mind.
  3. Overview of processing vs managing sensations.
  4. Elements of therapeutic work (including personhood of the therapist, therapeutic relationship and grounding in Gestalt theory
  5. Benefits, advantages, limitations, and contraindications working with sensations.