Ateliers de perfectionnement professionnel précongrès

Voir ci-dessous la liste des ateliers précongrès offerts dans le cadre du congrès annuel de la SCP de 2020.

Les ateliers de perfectionnement professionnel précongrès sont prévus le 27 mai 2020.

 

Les membres et les affiliés de la SCP qui se sont inscrits à la fois à un atelier précongrès et à l’ensemble des activités du congrès ont droit à une réduction de 10 %.

Veuillez remplir le formulaire suivant pour réclamer la réduction de 10 % à laquelle vous avez droit. Formulaire de remboursement de la remise des frais d’inscription aux ateliers précongrès

(Les remboursements seront traités après le congrès.)


La SCP se réserve le droit d’annuler tout atelier précongrès si le nombre d’inscriptions est insuffisant. Dans ce cas, les personnes inscrites peuvent s’inscrire à un autre atelier ou être remboursées.

 

Frais d’inscription aux ateliers

  Demi-journée (préinscription*) Demi-journée (tarif régulier) Journée complète (préinscription*) Journée complète (tarif régulier)
Non-membre 175 $ 220 $ 325 $ 400 $
Membre de la SCP 130 $ 160 $ 250 $ 300 $
Membre étudiant 100 $ 125 $ 190 $ 225 $
Étudiant non membre 130 $ 150 $ 230 $ 250 $

* La période de préinscription se termine le 30 avril 2020 à 23 h 59 HNE.

Workshops

1 – Practice Made Simple: Creating and Sustaining a Successful Business
2 – Better (and Quicker) Data Cleaning using R and the Tidyverse
3 – Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder: Supporting Effective Practice in Clinical Psychology
4 – Behavioural Experiments for Intolerance of Uncertainty: A Treatment for Generalized Anxiety Disorder
5 – Le traitement du TAG: les expériences comportementales pour l’intolérance à l’incertitude
6 – Mindfulness-integrated CBT: A Four Stage Transdiagnostic Treatment Approach
7 – Developing Sustainable Program Leadership: Creating Manuals for Directors and Identifying Common Challenges
8 – A Compassion Focused Therapy (CFT) Approach to Shame-Based Difficulties in Sexual Minorities
9 – Prediction Statistics for Psychological Assessment
10 – Mediation analysis
11 – Digital CBT Interventions for Anxiety: Resources to Enhance Your Clinical Practice
12 – Introduction to Mentalization Based Treatment, an evidence based approach
13 – Reconsolidation: A primer for clinicians
14 – What Research Tells Us – and Doesn’t Tell Us – About Technology, Youth, and Their Families
15 – Questionable Measurement Practices and How to Avoid Them
16 – Applying DBT Skills in Your Clinical Practice: A Step by Step Approach to a Life Worth Living
17 – Social justice conversations: How to have conversations that move from discomfort to action
18 – Creating and Adapting Open Educational Resources
19 – Introduction to Narrative Exposure Therapy – an evidence-based short-term treatment for PTSD
20 – Developing Intercultural Resiliency and Healing Narratives through Nature and Culture
21 – Exploring screen-addiction, excessive or otherwise non-integrated use of screen-based technologies

Practice Made Simple: Creating and Sustaining a Successful Business

Presented by: Dr. Randy J. Paterson

Duration: Full Day (9:00 – 16:30)
Continuing Education Credits: 6 CE Credits / This continuing education activity in psychotherapy is recognized by the Ordre des psychologues du Québec
OPQ recognition number: RE03288-20.
Sponsored by: Changeways Clinic
Target Audience: Graduate Students, clinicians in large organizations considering private practice, existing private practitioners
Skill/Difficulty Level: Introductory
Workshop Description:
Therapists routinely say it. « I was never trained how to run a business. » We were taught assessment strategy, how to conduct therapy, and when to refer – but not how to perform many of the central activities involved in running a private practice. So we stumble through, gradually picking up ideas and skills as we go along, and about the time we’re planning our retirement we begin to think we understand.

But running a practice doesn’t have to be difficult. Many of the skills can be communicated and learned relatively easily. This full-day program covers a broad range of strategies to make your practice more successful, more effective, and more fun. Topics include: The pros and cons of private practice, strategies to identify your ideal practice, creating a business plan with reasonable income and expense projections, managing revenue and taxation issues, promoting the service effectively and inexpensively, finding office space, furnishing and sound-dampening the space, growing the business with associates and reception staff, handling payroll, designing a website, selecting practice management software, tracking financial indicators, and making the service personally and professionally sustainable over the long term.

Learning Outcomes:
1. Define the characteristics of your ideal business
2. Be able to create a business plan incorporating realistic revenue and expense projections
3. Determine the best model (proprietorship, corporation, partnership) for your business
4. Promote the service in an effective yet economical manner
5. Understand how to manage clinic finances and relevant tax issues
6. Create an inviting space that preserves privacy and enhances the service


Better (and Quicker) Data Cleaning using R and the Tidyverse

Presented by: Mark C. Adkins & Robert Cribbie

Duration: Half Day (08:30-12:00)
Continuing Education Credits: 3 CE Credits / This continuing education activity in psychotherapy is recognized by the Ordre des psychologues du Québec
OPQ recognition number: RE03288-20.
Sponsored by: Canadian Psychological Association
Target Audience: Researchers and graduate students
Skill/Difficulty Level: Intermediate
Workshop Description:
Data cleaning is a time consuming and often error-prone process which every researcher will experience. It is said that 80% of data analysis time is spent on the process of cleaning and preparing the data (Dasu & Johnson, 2003), but this time spent cleaning and preparing data can be dramatically reduced by using the right tools/techniques for the job.

The workshop will begin with a foundational discussion on data structures within R and general coding practices. The focus will then shift to the more practical topics of using a variety of packages to import/export data, inspect and manipulate specific types of data (including categorical, dates, and character type), reformat data, and produce quality graphics to showcase your data. A publicly available dataset will be used as a running example throughout the workshop to provide hands-on experience using each of the techniques discussed.

Periodic interactive exercises will be presented to allow attendees an opportunity to work collaboratively to solve common data cleaning dilemmas. Attendees are encouraged to bring data from their own research to apply the techniques covered throughout the workshop.

Learning Outcomes:
1. Attendees will have a firm grasp of managing and manipulating data within R.
2. Learn to code in a cleaner, less error-prone, fashion to facilitate sharing R-scripts and working collaboratively.
3. Keep in step with open science practices in terms of sharing code that other users can more easily understand.


Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder: Supporting Effective Practice in Clinical Psychology

Presented by: Kaitlyn McLachlan & Jacqueline Pei

Duration: Half Day (08:30-12:00)
Continuing Education Credits: 3 CE Credits / This continuing education activity in psychotherapy is recognized by the Ordre des psychologues du Québec
OPQ recognition number: RE03288-20.
Sponsored by: Canadian Psychological Association
Target Audience: Clinicians, graduate students
Skill/Difficulty Level: Introductory
Workshop Description:
Background: Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is a common neurodevelopmental disability impacting over 1.4 million Canadians linked with difficulties in cognition, emotional and behavioural regulation, and health challenges. Individuals with FASD experience elevated mental health comorbidity, and adversities including caregiving disruption, school failures, and legal involvement. Many require supports in employment and housing as adults.

Clinical psychologists can play an important role in identifying needs and implementing effective interventions for individuals with FASD, though many lack FASD-informed knowledge and skill required for practice with this population.

Methods: This workshop is designed for practicing psychologists. We will provide evidence-based knowledge and practice skills required to support foundational competence for FASD-informed practice, via: 1) provision of information on FASD prevalence and clinical characteristics; 2) practicing supportive and destigmatizing clinical conversations about alcohol use during pregnancy and FASD; 3) discussing best assessment practices for FASD within and outside the multidisciplinary team; and 4) considering effective intervention and accommodation practices. Impact: Participants will leave with increased knowledge about FASD and will have opportunities to apply learning via clinical cases, role playing, and group discussion.

Learning Outcomes:
1. Describe the prevalence, associated costs, and characteristics of individuals with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder.
2. Identify and apply best practice strategies for discussing alcohol use and pregnancy with clients, as well as the diagnosis of FASD with individuals and families.
3. Select and apply key screening and assessment strategies and tools when identifying or evaluating individuals with FASD in clinical practice at psychologists.
4. Communicate evidence-based and emerging best practice interventions for supporting clients with FASD in clinical practice as psychologists.
5. Apply strategies to modify their usual assessment and intervention practices to accommodate and promote best outcomes for clients with FASD.


Behavioural Experiments for Intolerance of Uncertainty: A Treatment for Generalized Anxiety Disorder

Presented by: Elizabeth Hebert & Michel Dugas

Duration: Half Day (13:00-16:30)
Continuing Education Credits: 3 CE Credits / This continuing education activity in psychotherapy is recognized by the Ordre des psychologues du Québec
OPQ recognition number: RE03288-20.
Sponsored by: Clinical Psychology Section of the CPA
Target Audience: Clinicians, graduate students, researchers
Skill/Difficulty Level: Intermediate
Workshop Description:
This workshop will focus on a new cognitive-behavioural treatment (CBT) for generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) that exclusively targets intolerance of uncertainty. We first present strategies to enhance the clinical recognition and assessment of GAD, paying special attention to the challenges of differential diagnosis.

Next, we introduce a new theoretical model of intolerance of uncertainty and use this to guide the conceptualization and treatment of GAD symptoms. The majority of the workshop will focus on presenting a new treatment for GAD: behavioural experiments for intolerance of uncertainty.

We provide a structured method for using behavioural experiments and discuss their theoretical and clinical benefits (as compared to exposure and traditional cognitive strategies). We will demonstrate concrete clinical examples of behavioural experiments for intolerance of uncertainty using clinical vignettes and experiential exercises. Common clinical pitfalls will be highlighted with our suggestions for addressing these. Special considerations for therapists will also be discussed in detail, including addressing therapists’ own attitude toward uncertainty.

Finally, we will briefly review data on the efficacy, mechanisms, and predictors of treatment success in CBT for GAD.

Learning Outcomes:
1. Improve the recognition and assessment of generalized anxiety disorder by conceptualizing it as a « Phobia of Uncertainty »
2. Introduce a new theoretical model to understand the relationship between intolerance of uncertainty and generalized anxiety disorder and to guide treatment intervention
3. Treat generalized anxiety disorder more effectively by using behavioural experiments to target intolerance of uncertainty


Le traitement du TAG: les expériences comportementales pour l’intolérance à l’incertitude

Presented by: Jessie Bossé & Michel Dugas

Duration: Half Day (08:30-12:00)
Continuing Education Credits: 3 CE Credits / This continuing education activity in psychotherapy is recognized by the Ordre des psychologues du Québec
OPQ recognition number: RE03288-20.
Sponsored by: Clinical Psychology Section of the CPA
Target Audience: Clinicians, graduate students
Skill/Difficulty Level: Intermediate
Workshop Description:
Cet atelier portera sur l’évaluation, la conceptualisation et le traitement cognitivo-comportemental du trouble d’anxiété généralisée (TAG) chez les adultes. La première partie de l’atelier sera consacrée à l’identification et à l’évaluation du TAG. Étant donné le manque de spécificité des critères diagnostiques du TAG dans le DSM5 (et la faible fiabilité diagnostique du trouble), une attention particulière sera portée aux indices cliniques pouvant faciliter le diagnostic différentiel. La deuxième partie de l’atelier portera sur la présentation d’un nouveau traitement pour le TAG : les expériences comportementales (ECs) pour l’intolérance à l’incertitude. Les avantages théoriques et cliniques des ECs (par rapport aux stratégies verbales et à l’exposition) seront exposés, et une méthode structurée pour utiliser ces expériences sera présentée. Plusieurs exemples concrets d’ECs visant l’intolérance à l’incertitude seront ensuite présentés sous forme de vignettes cliniques. Les attitudes à privilégier de la part du thérapeute seront aussi discutées de façon détaillée dans cette partie de l’atelier. Finalement, les données quant à l’efficacité, aux mécanismes et aux prédicteurs du succès thérapeutique de la TCC pour les individus souffrant du TAG seront présentées.

Learning Outcomes:
1. Mieux reconnaître le trouble d’anxiété généralisée : concevoir le trouble d’anxiété généralisée comme une « phobie de l’incertitude »
2. Intervenir de façon plus efficace auprès des personnes atteintes du trouble d’anxiété généralisée: traitement validé scientifiquement
3. Intervenir auprès des personnes souffrant du trouble d’anxiété généralisée selon un modèle théorique sous-jacent


Mindfulness-integrated CBT: A Four Stage Transdiagnostic Treatment Approach

Presented by: Alia Offman

Duration: Full Day (9:00 – 16:30)
Continuing Education Credits: 6 CE Credits / This continuing education activity in psychotherapy is recognized by the Ordre des psychologues du Québec
OPQ recognition number: RE03288-20.
Sponsored by: MiCBT Institute
Target Audience: Clinicians
Skill/Difficulty Level: Intermediate
Workshop Description:
Mindfulness involves paying attention to what is being experienced in the present moment, with a nonjudgmental, unbiased and non-reactive attitude. Careful research continues to show that integrating mindfulness training with cognitive and behavioural interventions is a potent contribution to the treatment of a wide range of disorders. Mindfulness-integrated Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (MiCBT) is an evidence-based sophisticated integration of mindfulness core principles and traditional CBT. MiCBT consists of a four-stage transdiagnostic treatment approach, i.e., it is applicable with a wide range of conditions and ages. It is based on the integration of traditional establishment of mindfulness with well established principles and methods from cognitive and behavioural traditions.

The aim of this workshop is to introduce you to MiCBT to assist your work with acute and chronic conditions, and improve the prevention of relapse in a wide range of psychological disorders. It will describe the important theoretical framework underlying MiCBT and introduce participants to the use of these skills across a wide range of chronic and acute conditions. Importantly, this workshop will expand your common understanding of operant conditioning and provide a strong neurobehavioural basis for integrating mindfulness training with traditional CBT.

Learning Outcomes:
1. Gain an understanding of principles and skills in mindfulness practice.
2. Apply a basic mindfulness-based interoceptive exposure task.
3. Explain the rationale for integrating mindfulness with CBT in MiCBT.
4. Describe the theoretical fundamentals of mindfulness training and supporting research.
5. Apply the principles of mindfulness-based interpersonal skills.
6. Describe the principles of mindfulness-based relapse prevention strategies


Developing Sustainable Program Leadership: Creating Manuals for Directors and Identifying Common Challenges

Presented by: Sara Hagstrom, Lesley Lutes, Susan Vandermorris, Amanda Maranzan, Jacqueline Cohen

Duration: Half Day (08:30-12:00)
Continuing Education Credits: 3 CE Credits
Sponsored by: Canadian Psychological Association
Target Audience: Training directors of both university training programs and internship/residency sites as well as other psychologists who are interested in entering these roles in the future
Skill/Difficulty Level: Intermediate
Workshop Description:
Directors of professional psychology training programs (DCTs and DoTs) manage a vast array of policies and procedures. Substantial knowledge is consolidated in the experience of current directors, leaving programs vulnerable should their directors leave the role unexpectedly. The primary purpose of this workshop is to share resources and take steps to develop Director Manuals for our programs. A secondary purpose is to identify other challenges to sustainable program leadership. Our goal is to create program-specific Director Manuals that outline the responsibilities and timelines that directors follow, as well as the resources they use. Manuals will include common core materials as well as program-specific components.

Workshop presenters will share sample Tables of Contents, which include topics such as duties, timelines, general and clinical training issues, and administration, and financial issues). Small group discussions will help participants identify which components of the manual are already available within their programs and which need to be developed.

Attendees should bring existing documents from their programs to allow for work on their own manuals as well as sharing of resources.

The workshop will culminate with a real-time exploration and identification (via mentimeter) of the common barriers to the sustainable leadership of academic and internship programs (e.g., lack of organizational support, financial and human resource constraints). The 2021 CCPPP workshop will be an opportunity to have an extended discussion in response to these survey results and to problem-solve the common and pressing barriers to sustainable program leadership.

Learning Outcomes:
1. Identify the core and program-specific components of a manual for training directors
2. Share materials across programs that would typically be included in a DCT or DoT Director Manual.
3. Create or refine their own Director Manual.
4. Identify the most salient barriers to creating sustainable leadership in their own programs


A Compassion Focused Therapy (CFT) Approach to Shame-Based Difficulties in Sexual Minorities

Presented by: Nicola Petrocchi & Leanne Dyck-Rondeau

Duration: Full Day (9:00 – 16:30)
Continuing Education Credits: 6 CE Credits / This continuing education activity in psychotherapy is recognized by the Ordre des psychologues du Québec
OPQ recognition number: RE03288-20.
Sponsored by: Clinical Psychology Section of the CPA
Target Audience: Researchers, clinicians, students, and teachers of psychology
Skill/Difficulty Level: Intermediate
Workshop Description:
In this workshop we will explore how Compassion Focused Therapy (CFT), a modern evolutionary and biopsychosocial psychotherapeutic approach, conceptualizes the mental difficulties that LGBTQ individuals might experience (Petrocchi et.al., 2019; 2019; 2018; 2017; 2016). Sexual minorities face unique challenges related to their sexual minority identity, making them particularly prone to developing high levels of shame, internalized stigma and self-criticism. Through instruction, experiential practices, and reflective exercises Dr. Petrocchi will outline the core components of CFT and propose how developing a sense of inner safeness through compassion-building practices might counteract the pathogenic effects of shame and self-criticism and promote flourishing.

Upon completion participants will be familiar with the fundamental tenants of CFT. They will be equipped with key elements to consider when working with sexual minorities: internalized stigma, the unique origins of shame in this population, and the need for social support when working for social justice for sexual minorities. In addition, they will have actively experienced numerous Compassionate Mind Training exercises. In this way, this active workshop experience will equip participants with ideas they can continue to reflect upon and tools they can immediately experiment with in their practice after their conference experience concludes.

Learning Outcomes:
1. Participants will understand how Compassion Focused Therapy (CFT) is founded in evolutionary psychology.
2. Participants will understand the three emotional regulation systems according to CFT.
3. Participants will understand how CFT views compassion as a motivation as opposed to an emotion.
4. Participants will understand the particularities of sexual minorities in their experience of shame and self-criticism.
5. Participants will be sensitized to sexual minorities’ experience of internalized stigma.
6. Participants will be sensitized to the key role of social support for sexual minorities.


Prediction Statistics for Psychological Assessment

Presented by: Karl Hanson

Duration: Full Day (9:00 – 16:30)
Continuing Education Credits: 6 CE Credits / This continuing education activity in psychotherapy is recognized by the Ordre des psychologues du Québec
OPQ recognition number: RE03288-20.
Sponsored by: Canadian Psychological Association
Target Audience: Primarily intended for individuals who use, or are considering using, risk assessment tools in their applied practice.
Skill/Difficulty Level: Intermediate
Workshop Description:
This workshop provides training on the statistics used to evaluate actuarial risk prediction tools. These tools specify a set of risk factors (static or dynamic), combine them using an explicit method, and estimate rates of the outcome. The focus will be on the type of risk prediction tools now commonly used in corrections and forensic mental health. The content would also directly apply to prediction tools in other domains, such as mental health (suicide), education (school completion), and child welfare.

This workshop is primarily intended for individuals who use, or are considering using, risk assessment tools in their applied practice. Only basic knowledge of statistics is presumed (e.g., means, SD). Participants will learn the basic concepts required to evaluate risk tools, including the distinction between diagnostic and prognostic statistics, discrimination and calibration. Most of the workshop will involve working through a series of exercises that demonstrate the strengths and weaknesses of specific evaluation methods, such as the fourfold table, AUC’s, Cohen’s d, the E/O index, logistic regression, and calibration plots. Bring a calculator.

Learning Outcomes:
1. Understand the two major indices for evaluating risk prediction tools (discrimination and calibration).
2. Be able to identify statistics that are appropriate for evaluating diagnostic tools, prediction tools, or both.
3. Calculate and interpret a selection of discrimination statistics for risk prediction tools.
4. Calculate and interpret a selection of calibration statistics for fixed follow-up studies.


Mediation analysis

Presented by: Milica Miočević & Carl Falk

Duration: Full Day (9:00 – 16:30)
Continuing Education Credits: 6 CE Credits / This continuing education activity in psychotherapy is recognized by the Ordre des psychologues du Québec
OPQ recognition number: RE03288-20.
Sponsored by: Canadian Psychological Association
Target Audience: Researchers and graduate students in psychology
Skill/Difficulty Level: Intermediate
Workshop Description:
Statistical mediation analysis is used in thousands of studies in psychology every year, and the seminal paper by Baron and Kenny (1986) is among the 33 most cited scientific articles across fields. Methods for mediation analysis have been an active area of research. This workshop will cover theoretical underpinnings of mediation analysis, optimal methods for testing for mediation in single and multiple mediator models, implementations of methods for mediation analysis in R, and templates for reporting results from mediation analyses for single- and multiple-mediator models.

After the workshop, participants will be able to identify the optimal method for testing their mediation hypotheses, select an effect size measure for the mediated effect(s) that suits their research question, and describe their findings in a format that is appropriate for journal articles in psychology.

Furthermore, participants will learn the basics of R and how to conduct mediation analysis in R.

Learning Outcomes:
1. understanding the difference between mediators, confounders, and moderators
2. knowing how to test for mediation in a single mediator model
3. learning how to test for mediation in multiple mediator models
4. understanding effect size measures for the mediated effect in single and multiple mediator models ability to estimate mediation models in R
5. optimal reporting of results from mediation analysis for a journal article


Digital CBT Interventions for Anxiety: Resources to Enhance Your Clinical Practice

Presented by: Kristen E. Buhr & Judith Law

Duration: Half Day (13:00-16:30)
Continuing Education Credits: 3 CE Credits / This continuing education activity in psychotherapy is recognized by the Ordre des psychologues du Québec
OPQ recognition number: RE03288-20.
Sponsored by: Anxiety Canada
Target Audience: Clinicians
Skill/Difficulty Level: Introductory
Workshop Description:
The advancement and increased availability of digital technology is leading to major developments in the psychological treatment of mental health problems. This workshop will focus on the emerging role of digital technology in CBT for anxiety and will present key resources for enhancing clinical practice. Participants will learn about Anxiety Canada’s free on-line self-help anxiety management course, My Anxiety Plan (MAP), for parents and adults, which includes lessons on relaxation/mindfulness, healthy/balanced thinking, and facing fears. Participants will also have the opportunity to engage in an interactive walk through of the newest version of Anxiety Canada’s free MindShift CBT app, a comprehensive and user-friendly anxiety management resource that includes psycho-education, relaxation/mindfulness tools, cognitive strategies (e.g., thought records, belief/behavioural experiments), and behavioural strategies (e.g., exposure, healthy habits), as well as features for self monitoring, tracking progress, setting goals, and sharing information. Information on the effectiveness of these digital interventions will be presented. Participants will also have the opportunity to discuss the ways that digital technology can enhance one’s clinical practice, as well as the potential limitations and ethical issues of digital interventions.

Learning Outcomes:
1. Understand the emerging role of digital technology in psychological treatments
2. Identify and be familiar with key digital resources utilizing CBT for anxiety developed by Anxiety Canada (MAPs and MindShift CBT app)
3. Describe specific ways that digital technology can enhance clinical practice and improve client engagement
4. Identify limitations and ethical issues related to digital interventions


Introduction to Mentalization Based Treatment, an evidence based approach

Presented by: Karen Ensink

Duration: Half Day (13:00-16:30)
Continuing Education Credits: 3 CE Credits / This continuing education activity in psychotherapy is recognized by the Ordre des psychologues du Québec
OPQ recognition number: RE03288-20.
Sponsored by: Canadian Psychological Association
Target Audience: Clinicians and graduate students
Skill/Difficulty Level: Intermediate
Workshop Description:
Background/rationale: Mentalization Based Treatment has become a well recognized evidenced based treatment widely used in the treatment of adults and adolescents with personality disorders. It has also been adapted for use with adults and adolescents with other psychological difficulties, as well as children and parents.

The rationale for this workshop is to introduce clinicians and researchers to Mentalization Based Treatment, its core principles, theory and evidence base, as well as interventions.

Methods: We will use a combination of didactic teaching, interactive learning and small break-out groups to develop and practice skills. Results: Participants will gain knowledge of mentalizing, its normal development as well as failures and breakdowns of mentalizing and how prementalizing modes present and can be identified. The workshop will focus on understanding and developing MBT skills with adults and adolescents with personality disorders as well as other psychological difficulties or exposure to trauma. Both individual and group based treatment modalities will be introduced. Conclusions: Participants will develop knowledge and skills regarding how to integrate MBT into their clinical practice.

Learning Outcomes:
1. Knowledge of Mentalization Based Treatment and links between mentalizing and psychological functioning
2. Skills in identifying different types of mentalizing difficulties
3. Skills in formulation and intervention using an MBT approach


Reconsolidation: A primer for clinicians

Presented by: Alain Brunet

Duration: Half Day (08:30-12:00)
Continuing Education Credits: 3 CE Credits / This continuing education activity in psychotherapy is recognized by the Ordre des psychologues du Québec
OPQ recognition number: RE03288-20.
Sponsored by: Canadian Psychological Association
Target Audience: Clinicians
Skill/Difficulty Level: Intermediate
Workshop Description:
Neuroscience-based reconsolidation theory is creating a paradigm shift in the field of learning and memory. As a result of this enhanced understanding of how we make, store and retrieve important memories, novel effective treatment approaches are being developed, such as propranolol-based Reconsolidation Therapy for disorders that have at their core an emotional memory, like the Trauma and Stressor-related Disorders. This workshop offers a primer for the clinician interested in understanding the principles of reconsolidation and how they are being applied in psychotherapy. More specifically, the workshop will describe how reconsolidation theory came about and present the scientific evidence in favor of Reconsolidation Therapy for the treatment of the addictions, posttraumatic stress disorder, the adjustment disorders and for simple phobias.

Learning Outcomes:
1. Learn about Reconsolidation theory
2. Understand how Reconsolidation Therapy is conducted
3. Discover the clinical evidence in favor or Reconsolidation Therapy


What Research Tells Us – and Doesn’t Tell Us – About Technology, Youth, and Their Families

Presented by: Kelly Schwartz

Duration: Half Day (13:00-16:30)
Continuing Education Credits: 3 CE Credits / This continuing education activity in psychotherapy is recognized by the Ordre des psychologues du Québec
OPQ recognition number: RE03288-20.
Sponsored by: Canadian Psychological Association
Target Audience: Clinicians, researchers, and students.
Skill/Difficulty Level: Intermediate
Workshop Description:
It would be an understatement to state that the social world of children, adolescents, and their families have been invariably changed by the advent of technology and social media. As psychologists, we are called upon to know about the important social domains that contribute positively and negatively to child and family mental health, and this workshop will utilize the existing empirical and theoretical literature to address three main objectives: 1) Explore the pervasiveness of media and technology in family’s lives; 2) Digest the most recent research on how screen time and social media are changing the neurological, social, and emotional development of children and youth; and 3) Engage in discussion on discuss how family members can understand, model, and establish boundaries around media and technology. Emphasis will be on interpreting national studies (e.g., Common Sense Media) that address how, when, and why screen time happens in families and its effects on youth mental health, peer and family relationships. The workshop will address both positive and negative implications of media and technology use in families and how psychologists can provide support.

Learning Outcomes:
1. Participants will come to learn about the most accurate estimates of social media engagement in the lives of children and youth in North America
2. Given the volatility of social media use and the devotion of its users, participants will learn about prevention and intervention strategies that have an evidence base
3. Understand how and why children and adolescents use technology, with particular focus on both quantitative and qualitative studies that explore domains most relevant to psychologists (e.g., learning, self-regulation, etc)
4. Discover the impact – both positive and negative – of social media use by children and adolescents on mental health
5. Participants will leave with a strong reference list related to research and practice, including web-based resources particularly relevant to families


Questionable Measurement Practices and How to Avoid Them

Presented by: Jessica Flake & Eiko Fried

Duration: Half Day (13:00-16:30)
Continuing Education Credits: 3 CE Credits / This continuing education activity in psychotherapy is recognized by the Ordre des psychologues du Québec
OPQ recognition number: RE03288-20.
Sponsored by: Canadian Psychological Association
Target Audience: Researchers, graduate students, and those who use psychological assessments for research or practice
Skill/Difficulty Level: Intermediate
Workshop Description:
In this workshop, we will define questionable measurement practices and explain how they make it impossible to evaluate validity threats to a study’s conclusions. We will demonstrate that QMPs are common, offer a stunning source of researcher degrees of freedom, pose a serious threat to cumulative psychological science, but are largely ignored. We will go through examples from the depression literature that clarify what QMPs are and how they threaten the valid use of psychological assessments. We provide a set of questions that researchers, practitioners, and consumers of scientific research can consider to identify and avoid QMPs. Through interactive prompts, we will illustrate to researchers and practitioners how they can select, use, and modify psychological assessments in a way that promotes construct validity, replicability, and transparency in their own work. We will discuss how measurement transparency promotes rigorous research, allows for thorough evaluations of a study’s inferences, and is necessary for meaningful replication studies. This workshop is interactive and geared toward those who use psychological measures in their own work and want to improve the rigor of their measurement practices.

Learning Outcomes:
1. Learners will be able to define the term questionable measurement practice
2. Learners will be able to identify questionable measurement practices in research reports
3. Learners will be able to identify measurement decisions they make in their own research and throughout the research process
4. Learners will be able to plan their research to use of assessments to prevent questionable measurement practices
5. Learners will be able to list ways in which measure and assessment use can threaten cumulative psychological science
6. Learners will be able to relate concepts of transparency, open science, and preregistration to measurement, assessment, and psychometrics.


Applying DBT Skills in Your Clinical Practice: A Step by Step Approach to a Life Worth Living

Presented by: Kafui Sawyer & Erin Beettam

Duration: Full Day (9:00 – 16:30)
Continuing Education Credits: 6 CE Credits / This continuing education activity in psychotherapy is recognized by the Ordre des psychologues du Québec
OPQ recognition number: RE03288-20.
Sponsored by: Joy Health and Research Centre
Target Audience: Clinicians and Graduate Students in Clinical Training
Skill/Difficulty Level: Intermediate
Workshop Description:
Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) is an evidence-based treatment for Borderline Personality Disorder, substance abuse disorders and severe depressive symptoms (Linehan et al., 1999; Goldstien et al., 2015). Developed by Marsha Linehan in 1991, and based on behavior theory, cognitive theory, and mindfulness practice, DBT is a compassionate process to helping clients with chronic suicidalilty, selfharm behaviors, and emotional dysregulation. Even though DBT originated from Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT), the treatment processes are different. Unlike CBT, which focuses on changing dysfunctional cognitions to regulate or change emotions, DBT, focuses on emotion, behavior and cognition. DBT assumes some emotional states are primary and often trigger dysfunctional cognition which then perpetuates further emotional pain and often results in impulsive behaviors or ineffective problem-solving attempts. DBT has been extensively researched to treat other mental illness like PTSD. (Feigenbaum et al., 2011; Bohus et al., 2013). DBT dramatically reduces suicide attempts and parasuicide behaviors over Treatment as Usual (TAU) or Treatment by Experts (TBE). DBT reduces emotional dysregulation, hospitalization, and hopelessness. Overall, DBT improves global functioning and fosters a life worth living.

Learning Outcomes:
1. Recognize DBT’s 5 functions and modes of therapy
2. Recognize the characteristic of Borderline Personality Disorder
3. Recognize the structure of an individual therapy
4. How to do Chain Analysis in DBT
5. Identify and implement DBT skills including mindfulness, emotion regulation, distress tolerance, interpersonal effectiveness, and walking the middle path
6. Be able to run a DBT informed group process to help clients who engage in self-harm and struggle with suicidality


Social justice conversations: How to have conversations that move from discomfort to action

Presented by: Natasha Maynard-Pemba

Duration: Half Day (13:00-16:30)
Continuing Education Credits: 3 CE Credits / This continuing education activity in psychotherapy is recognized by the Ordre des psychologues du Québec
OPQ recognition number: RE03288-20.
Sponsored by: Counselling Psychology Section of the CPA
Target Audience: supervisors, clinicians, graduate students, professors
Skill/Difficulty Level: Intermediate
Workshop Description:
This workshop will take an inclusive and experiential approach to understanding how we can be change agents in impactful ways within the systems in which we work. The workshop will include breakout groups and exercises to aid competency development. As counselling psychology practitioners and scholars, we are charged to be social justice advocates within our field. Part of the mission of the CPA is « To improve the health and welfare of all Canadians. » If you find yourself in your work unable, unwilling, or unsure (e.g. feeling constrained by system dynamics, policies, and regulations) about meeting the needs of all who enter your doors, a conversation about social justice may be of great importance in your continued development. Conversations on social justice are often uncomfortable because they are personal (i.e. representing our intersecting identities, values, histories, defenses, biases, positionality). By acknowledging the inherent complexity (i.e. that it is not just a discussion about race or identity or right and wrong), we start from a deeper place of compassion that makes these conversations possible.

Learning Outcomes:
1. Identify areas of injustice within mental health and counselling
2. List and assess ways in which systemic and personal processes prevent social justice engagement
3. Describe two strategies that can help move challenging social justice conversations from uncomfortable to engaging
4. List two approaches to making social change within one’s institution or organization


Creating and Adapting Open Educational Resources

Presented by: Meghan Norris, Lillian Hogendoorn, Julian Enright, and Tyson Baker

Duration: Half Day (8:30-12:00)
Continuing Education Credits: 3 CE Credits
Sponsored by: Canadian Psychological Association
Target Audience: Researchers, instructors, graduate students
Skill/Difficulty Level: Introductory
Workshop Description:
Open Educational Resources (OER), are becoming popular in higher education. OER are broadly defined as books, activities, and tools that are free from technical financial barriers, and that can be adopted, adapted or shared. Benefits of OER include reducing financial barriers for students to access scholarly work, making scholarly work accessible to the broader public, and giving authors and instructors more intellectual and technical control over content being shared.

Participants are encouraged to bring laptops or tablets so that they can fully engage with the hands-on elements of this workshop.

Learning Outcomes:
1. Gain an understanding of OER and the legal and technical mechanisms that facilitate the creation and sharing of OER.
2. Learn where to find Open Educational Resources that can be adopted or adapted for their coursework
3. Explore analytics related to OER that can be helpful for creators and instructors
4. Explore tools for OER creation or adaptation, including Pressbooks for EDU and H5P.


Introduction to Narrative Exposure Therapy – an evidence-based short-term treatment for PTSD

Presented by: Elisa Kaltenbach

Duration: Full Day (9:00 – 16:30)
Continuing Education Credits: 6 CE Credits / This continuing education activity in psychotherapy is recognized by the Ordre des psychologues du Québec
OPQ recognition number: RE03288-20.
Sponsored by: Canadian Psychological Association
Target Audience: Clinicians and researchers with basic knowledge on Posttraumatic Stress Disorder
Skill/Difficulty Level: Intermediate
Workshop Description:
Narrative Exposure Therapy (NET; Schauer, Neuner, & Elbert, 2011) is an evidence-based short-term treatment for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). It is based on cognitive-behavioural exposure techniques and Testimony Therapy. The focus on the autobiographical elaboration of traumatic experiences makes it particularly suitable for people with multiple traumatic experiences such as organised, sexual, and domestic violence, as well as other severe life-threatening experiences. In cooperation with the therapist, the client transforms fragmented memories into a coherent narrative and integrates them in their biographical context. NET has been tested in many studies and has been found to reduce PTSD symptoms as well as comorbid symptoms (e.g. depression). It is culturally adaptable and has been successfully implemented in low resource settings. In this workshop, the theoretical background and different components of NET will be presented. There will be an emphasis on practice exercises and role-plays to enable participants to develop practical skills and strategies on working with trauma survivors. Participants will be given space for discussion and questions. A general knowledge about PTSD is required for the participation in the workshop.

Learning Outcomes:
1. Participants will gain knowledge on exposure therapy in trauma survivors, with emphasis on Narrative Exposure Therapy
2. Participants will be able to implement elements of the workshop in their clinical practice, e.g. psychoeducation, lifeline, exposure
3. Participants gain general knowledge on PTSD and important treatment components
4. Participants gain insights on how to deal with difficulties during exposure
5. Participants will increase their self-awareness on their own experiences and how this affects


Developing Intercultural Resiliency and Healing Narratives through Nature and Culture

Presented by: Joanne Ginter

Duration: Half Day (08:30-12:00)
Continuing Education Credits: 3 CE Credits / This continuing education activity in psychotherapy is recognized by the Ordre des psychologues du Québec
OPQ recognition number: RE03288-20.
Sponsored by: Canadian Psychological Association
Target Audience: Clinicians and graduate students
Skill/Difficulty Level: Intermediate
Workshop Description:
The changing multicultural landscape is compelling therapists to address greater diversity within client populations, including a broader spectrum of client narratives and cultural practices. While there is an acknowledgement for culturally fused counselling, many therapists continue to struggle to intervene with client populations of differing cultural beliefs and worldviews. These struggles are historically due to a lack of research in this area and training programs to support developing a pluralist worldview. This workshop emphasizes ways that healing practices found within nature and culture can be integrated into the therapeutic context through the promotion of intercultural resiliency.

Interculturalism allows for relationship building and learning from each other while taking the therapist deeper than multicultural or cross-cultural communication. Resiliency allows for creating new meanings to unfortunate life events based on developing the self through mentorship and community, the building blocks of resiliency. In the development of intercultural resiliency all resources are respected and included while fostering a more diversified narrative. Intercultural resiliency recognizes cultural diversity found in nature and one’s own worldview to guide therapists to becoming more pluralistic in practice.

Learning Outcomes:
1. Define the underlying ideals of intercultural resiliency, the components of culturally infused counselling and understanding the essential elements that define one’s worldview
2. Identify ways the building blocks of resiliency and the resiliency process can be fostered across diverse cultures
3. Participate in activities to self-reflect on one’s worldview and how to use the become more diversified and pluralist in practice
4. Participate in 2-3 activities that foster diversity and pluralism in practice with children, youth and their families
5. Learn ways to integrate nature and cultural practices found within diverse populations to promote healing


Exploring screen-addiction, excessive or otherwise non-integrated use of screen-based technologies

Presented by: Mari Swingle

Duration: Half Day (13:00-16:30)
Continuing Education Credits: 3 CE Credits / This continuing education activity in psychotherapy is recognized by the Ordre des psychologues du Québec
OPQ recognition number: RE03288-20.
Sponsored by: Canadian Psychological Association
Target Audience: Active practitioners/clinicians and students who wish a deeper understanding of the relationship of excessive or inappropriate integration of screen usage to lack of wellness in adults and alteration in the socio-emotional and cognitive development of children.
Skill/Difficulty Level: Introductory
Workshop Description:
The Elephant in the Treatment Chair / Addiction in the 21st century Screen-based technologies (computers, tablets, gaming consoles, phones, pads and pods) are fully assimilated in modern life (scholastics, work, research and play). Interactive technology is in every workplace, school and home, car, purse and pocket. But what is this doing to our brains and behavior; to our base neurophysiology? Much use is innocuous and just a reflection of modern times. But in clinical populations (and broadening sections of non-clinical populations), there appears to be a direct correlation between excessive and inappropriate screen usage and aliments or symptoms for which individuals are seeking psychological services (anxiety, depression, OCD, ICD, learning disabilities and ADHD, behavior disorders, conduct disorders, sexual dysfunction, marital/partner conflict and discord, anger management, and insomnia. Screen-Addiction is one of the most misunderstood and complex emergent addictions. This talk will go far beyond the questions of ‘is it real?’ exploring the biological/neurophysiological bases of content addiction (e.g., pornography), process addiction (e.g., communication/texting) combined (e.g., gaming) and compounding crossover -and most importantly what to do about it!

Learning Outcomes:
1. To recognize the signs and symptoms of possible contributions of excessive screen usage to lack of wellness and alterations in development (use patterns may be central in causing or contributing to the maintenance of presenting symptoms).
2. To recognize the contributions of culture and epigenetics and the need for variation in treatment strategy/intervention accordingly.
3. To become versed in the emergent research to be able to educate clients of the need for change in their/their child’s relationship to technology for treatment success and generalized health and wellness.
4. To learn how to identify behaviour patterns common to excessive usage and develop protocols for successful intervention.



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