Pre-Convention PD Workshops

See below for the Pre-Convention PD workshops being offered as part of the CPA’s 2019 annual convention and register now to attend.

Pre-Convention PD Workshops will be scheduled on May 30, 2019

 

CPA Members and Affiliates who have purchased both a Pre-Convention Workshop Registration and a Full Convention Registration are eligible for a 10% discount.

Please fill out the following form to submit for your rate reduction refund. the Pre-Convention Workshop and Convention Attendee Discount Form

(Refunds will be processed post Convention.)


The CPA reserves the right to cancel any Pre-Convention Workshops due to low registration. In the event that this should happen, registrants can register for another workshop or be reimbursed their payment.

 

Workshop Fees

Half (early)

Half (regular)

Full (early)

Full (regular)

Non-member

$175

$220

$325

$400

CPA/N4

$130

$160

$250

$300

Student

$100

$125

$190

$225

Behavioural Events as the Unit of Analysis in Case Formulation: Anger Episodes and Criminal Offences

Presented by: Raymond Chip Tafrate

Duration: Half Day (13:00 – 16:30)
Continuing Education Credits: 3.25
Sponsored by: North American Correctional and Criminal Justice Psychology Conference

Target Audience: Psychologists, other practitioners (e.g., psychiatrists, social workers, counselors, psychiatric nurses, case managers), and graduate students working with justice-involved clients.
Skill/Difficulty Level: Intermediate
Workshop Description:Across treatment settings, practitioners routinely see clients whose anger reactions and criminal behaviours contribute to significant loss and suffering. Although these topics may seem like a strange coupling, anger is the emotional excess most likely to be connected to criminal behaviour.
PART 1: Anger. While anger is a frequent and universal human emotion, it has received surprisingly little attention as a clinical problem. Practitioners commonly engage in unproductive conversations (e.g., clients venting about unfair actions of others) and struggle to identify clear treatment targets. In this workshop, participants will practice assessing the key features of client anger reactions by applying a 6-stage Anger Episode Model Interview to understand how anger is experienced and expressed in the client’s real-life interactions.
PART 2: Criminal Behaviour. Successful forensic intervention requires a focus on a set of risk domains and thinking patterns that facilitate criminal behaviour. Step-by-step guidelines will be provided for analyzing specific criminal events to better understand the relative influence of criminogenic thinking patterns and other key risk domains encapsulated in the RNR model (e.g., substance misuse, antisocial companions, maladaptive leisure time) at the time offences were committed. The analysis of criminal events provides a unique snapshot of the potential causes and maintenance of criminal behaviour and can enhance risk assessments.
The analysis of anger episodes and criminal offences forms the groundwork for effective case formulation and collaboratively identifying relevant treatment goals. This workshop is highly interactive, incorporating structured learning activities including audio-recorded work samples, small group exercises, and « real »-plays.
Learning Outcomes:
1. Become skilled at analyzing key features of clients’ anger reactions according to a 6-stage sequential anger episode model
2. Practice and learn to conduct an anger episode interview to efficiently identify relevant treatment targets
3. Learn to conceptualize forensic cases around criminal risk domains most active during recent offences to identify critical life areas to address in treatment
4. Become proficient in identifying criminogenic thoughts and thinking patterns that drive specific incidents of criminal behaviour


Key Principles of Effective Interviewing

Presented by: Hugues Hervé, Anton Schweighofer, Susan Kim

Duration: Half Day (9:00 – 12:30)
Continuing Education Credits: 3.25
Sponsored by: North American Correctional and Criminal Justice Psychology Conference

Target Audience: Clinicians and graduate students.
Skill/Difficulty Level: Intermediate
Workshop Description:
In this workshop, participants will learn the basic knowledge and skills required to conduct effective forensic interviews. Anyone tasked with collecting reliable and valid information from individuals will benefit from attending this workshop. Participants will learn through a combination of live demonstrations and a variety of engaging experiential exercises (e.g., real plays, improv-based games).
This workshop consists of the following modules:
1. Decision-Making: Findings from research and practice indicates that, too often, errors in decision-making stem from early, rash judgements that confuse the fact-finding and assessment components of this process. This module will introduce participants to a decision-making model that emphasizes critical thinking and the importance of separating these two processes.
2. Reading People: To effectively navigate any interview, interviewers need to know how to accurately read the verbal and non-verbal behaviours of their subjects. In this module, participants will learn how to do this by: (a) collecting baseline information (i.e., how interviewees typically behave when telling the truth), (b) monitoring key behavioural channels for leakage, (c) identifying ‘hot spots’ (i.e., changes from baseline or inconsistencies between channels that require further investigation), and (d) testing ‘hot spots.
3. Memory-Based Interviewing: Interviewing individuals about past events or future intentions is essentially an exploration of their retrospective and prospective memories. Accordingly, interviewers need to have a working knowledge of memory. This module will teach participants some interviewing techniques that facilitate memory retrieval and minimize contamination (e.g., the interview funnel).
Learning Outcomes:
1. Participants will learn a decision-making model that emphasizes critical thinking and the importance of separating the fact-finding and assessment components of decision making in order to reduce errors
2. Participants will learn how to effectively read the verbal and non-verbal behaviours of clients by: (a) collecting baseline information (i.e., how interviewees typically behave when telling the truth), (b) monitoring key behavioural channels for leakage, (c) identifying ‘hot spots’ (i.e., changes from baseline or inconsistencies between channels that require further investigation); and (d) testing ‘hot spots’
3. Participants will learn about retrospective and prospective memory, and evidence-based interviewing techniques that facilitate memory retrieval while minimizing memory contamination


The Emerging and Changing Practice of Police Psychology in a Canadian Context

Presented by: Sandra Jackson, Catherine Martin-Doto, Jeffrey Karp, Kyle Handley

Duration: Full Day (9:00 – 16:30)
Continuing Education Credits: 6
Sponsored by: North American Correctional and Criminal Justice Psychology Conference

Target Audience: Clinicians and graduate students.
Skill/Difficulty Level: Introductory
Workshop Description:
Although psychologists have been working with and for Canadian public service agencies for decades, there has been a sharp increase in demand over the past few years as the mental health of first responders has come into greater focus nationwide. More than ever, first responder organizations are reaching out to psychologists for research, fitness for duty, pre-employment selection, intervention services, program development, organizational change, and many other services, making police psychology an exciting new frontier for Canadian practitioners. The goal of this workshop is to provide some basic information about some of these key areas of practice so that psychologists can better judge their competencies to provide these services, discuss some of the core issues and resources on these topics, learn current best practices, and gain a view towards the future of this speciality in Canada. Topics to be reviewed: pre-employment selection, fitness for duty evaluations, officer-involved shootings and critical incidents, and Safeguard Programs.
Learning Outcomes:
1. Gain knowledge of the various roles and responsibilities psychologists can have with first responders and first responder organizations
2. Better understand best practices as well as some of the practical and ethical issues in regards to pre-employment assessment of police candidates
3. Learn the critical elements of fitness for duty assessments and the key considerations needed to effectively navigate the ethical challenges they can bring
4. Recognize the unique features of providing intervention services to uniform and civilian police members and receive an overview of best practice approaches
5. Better understand some of the unique stressors and intervention tools to help officers address critical incidents and the impact of SIU investigations on officers as well as the various assessment and intervention processes
6. Discover the emerging area of Safeguard and other mandatory wellness check programs in use across the country


Assessing and Treating Sleep Problems in Typically Developing Children and Children with Neurodevelopmental Disorders

Presented by: Penny Corkum, Shelly Weiss

Duration: Half Day (9:00 – 12:30)
Continuing Education Credits: 3.25

Target Audience: Clinicians and clinical students.
Skill/Difficulty Level: Intermediate
Workshop Description:
This interactive workshop will provide attendees with information about the physiology of sleep, as well as review the literature on the impact of insufficient sleep on mental and physical health for both typically developing children and children with neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs). Using a case-based approach to learning, the attendees will be introduced to a range of assessment tools, from subjective questionnaires to objective measures such as actigraphy and polysomnography. The attendees will learn when to employ each type of measure in order to identify different sleep disorders. A comprehensive approach to the assessment of sleep will be demonstrated by case studies for both typically developing children and children with NDDs. A review of evidence-based treatments will be provided for the most common sleep disorders in children. This overview involves a step-by-step approach to treatment, including consideration of sleep knowledge, healthy sleep practices, specific behavioural strategies, and medications. A more in-depth intervention approach will be described for the treatment of pediatric insomnia. Attendees will have the opportunity to work through case studies to develop treatment plans for both a typically developing child and a child with an NDD. By the end of this session, participants will be able to: describe the underlying factors that may be contributing to sleep problems; integrate into practice screening and assessment tools to help identify sleep problems; and choose effective strategies to treat sleep problems. There will be a question and answer period and resources will be shared.
Learning Outcomes:
1. To understand the basics of sleep physiology, the development of sleep problems in children, and the impact on the child and family
2. To be able to select appropriate assessment tools among subjective and objective measures to assess for sleep problems in children
3. To be familiar with and decide upon appropriate treatments for a range of sleep problems in children


Cognitive, Behavioural, and Neuropsychological Assessments in Populations with Complex Phenomenology

Presented by: Vina Goghari, Kristina Gicas

Duration: Half Day (13:00 – 16:30)
Continuing Education Credits: 3.25
Sponsored by:

Target Audience: Clinicians, researchers, graduate students, and community members.
Skill/Difficulty Level: Introductory
Workshop Description:
Mental health professionals are increasingly encountering complex populations who require evaluation of their cognition and behaviour. Populations with complex pathology and multi-morbid conditions pose unique challenges to assessment. Unfortunately, knowledge on how to work with and assess these populations is an undertrained area for mental health professionals, but this is necessary for appropriate treatment planning. In this workshop we will bring our expertise from a variety of populations, including complex psychopathology (e.g., psychosis), multi-morbid psychopathology groups (e.g., common co-occurring mental disorders, substance use, and traumatic brain injury), complex neurological disorders (e.g., Parkinson’s disease), and marginalized populations (e.g., homeless individuals). We will discuss the threats to accurate assessment in these populations including mood, motivation, premorbid functioning, physical functioning, validity of testing, standardization, and comparisons to existing norms. We will also discuss ways to mitigate these issues and describe suggested best practices in this area. This workshop will consist of didactics, audience participation, and interactive case examples. This workshop is applicable to both clinicians and researchers with interest in complex populations. The workshop will be led by two registered clinical psychologists with further expertise in neuropsychology. Dr. Goghari was the previous Chair of the Clinical Neuropsychology CPA Section and Dr. Gicas is the incoming Chair of the Clinical Neuropsychology Section.
Learning Outcomes:
1. Be able to identify key features that comprise complex populations encountered in clinical and research settings
2. Be able to identify core issues and challenges in evaluation of complex populations
3. Be able to discuss ways to adapt evaluations to mitigate challenges
4. Be able to identify suggested best practices for neuropsychological evaluation with complex populations
5. Be able to identify current knowledge gaps in this area and directions for future clinical and research practices


“It Takes a Village”: Supporting Transgender and Gender Diverse Children and Youth and Their Families

Presented by: Françoise Susset, Ashleigh Yule

Duration: Full Day (9:00 – 16:30)
Continuing Education Credits: 6
Sponsored by:

Target Audience: Clinicians and graduate students.
Skill/Difficulty Level: Introductory
Workshop Description:
A recent study revealed that 2.7 % of over 80,000 high school students in Minnesota identify as a gender other than the one assigned at birth (Pediatrics, 2017). In recent years, clinics everywhere that support transgender and gender variant children and youth are reporting an exponential growth in the numbers of new cases. Virtually all institutions dedicated to children and youth are faced with the challenge of welcoming and integrating gender diverse children and youth and deconstructing established paradigms regarding gender identity and expression. In a field plagued with controversy, certain approaches are emerging as best practices; the « gender affirmative model » proposes a new paradigm that views gender exploration and gender diversity not as a manifestation of confusion or psychopathology but as a healthy expression of the diversity of human experiences. As it has been shown that parents’ attitude and support have the greatest impact on their child’s well-being (Ryan et al., 2009; Travers et al., 2012; Veale et al., 2015), this workshop will focus on ways to intervene with parents struggling to understand their child’s needs as well as their own. We will look at the history underpinning our current notions regarding gender and gender identity development. We will also explore the intersections of gender diversity and neurodiversity, particularly the overlap of the autism spectrum with the gender spectrum, presenting the most recent research findings in this area as well as therapeutic guidelines for working with gender diverse autistic children, youth, and their families.
Learning Outcomes:
1. Participants will be able to understand manifestations of gender expression and gender identity through a developmental lens
2. Participants will be able to integrate a « gender affirmative » care model in their practice
3. Participants will increase their ability to identify the needs of trans and gender diverse children and youth and their families
4. Participants will increase their ability to support trans and gender diverse children and youth and their families
5. Participants will increase their understanding of the needs of gender diverse children and youth with ASD


New Developments in Psychotherapies for Psychosis – From CBT to Third Wave Interventions and Targeted Treatments

Presented by: Mahesh Menon, Nicola Wright, Faye Doell

Duration: Full Day (9:00 – 16:30)
Continuing Education Credits: 6
Sponsored by:

Target Audience: Clinicians and graduate students.
Skill/Difficulty Level: Intermediate
Workshop Description:
CBT for psychosis (CBTp) is an evidence-based intervention for schizophrenia spectrum disorders, that has been demonstrated to be effective in terms of reducing the distress and impairment associated with the positive symptoms of psychosis, and as having a significant effect on associated problems including comorbid mood and anxiety symptoms, social functioning, and rates of rehospitalization. As a result, CBTp has been recommended in an increasing number of treatment guidelines for psychosis both here in Canada, and internationally. In this workshop, we will provide participants with a brief overview of the theoretical model of CBT for psychosis, including the incorporation of ‘third wave’ interventions within traditional CBTp. There will be a strong emphasis on practical skills and strategies for working with paranoia, delusions and hallucinations, and these will be demonstrated through role-play and skills practice exercises. There will also be opportunity for participants to ask questions and to discuss application of CBTp in their own practice. Recent competency standards for training in CBTp and successful models of implementation will also briefly be discussed. The morning session will focus on traditional CBTp, and cover topics including the cognitive models of psychotic symptoms, developing effective formulations, and interventions for delusions and hallucinations. The afternoon session will provide an overview of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) for psychosis, Compassion Focussed Therapy (CFT) for psychosis, and Metacognitive Training (MCT) for psychosis.
Learning Outcomes:
1. Develop an introductory understanding of the theoretical model and practical application of CBT for psychosis
2. Develop an understanding of third wave approaches and targeted interventions for psychosis, including Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, Compassion Focussed Therapy and Metacognitive Training
3. Develop familiarity with several cognitive and behavioural skills that have been found to be effective in treating the positive symptoms of psychosis (e.g., understanding and working with paranoid thoughts or enhancing coping skills for individuals who are living with voices)
4. Gain an overview of recent competency standards for CBTp, and successful implementation strategies


Psychology: The Profession of Leaders

Presented by: Andrea Piotrowski, Jacqueline Cohen

Duration: Half Day (8:30 – 13:00) followed by CCPPP Annual General Meeting
Continuing Education Credits: 3.25
Sponsored by: The Canadian Council of Professional Psychology Programs (CCPPP)
Notes: Continental breakfast and lunch will be provided by the CCPPP.

Target Audience: Directors of training, psychologists involved in the training of students, and new psychologists. Students may also attend.
Skill/Difficulty Level: Intermediate
Workshop Description:
Professional psychologists trained in the scientist-practitioner model are well-positioned to take on a range of leadership and advocacy roles in public health and other sectors, yet the translation of learned clinical and analytical skills to these roles is often overlooked by graduate students and psychologists. Psychologists are currently more involved than ever in higher level, systems-related activities, such as supervision, consultation, innovation, evaluation, administration (in research teams, clinical work, or institutions), and management. The specialized level of training in understanding cognition and behaviour places professional psychologists in a powerful and influential position to lead, advocate, and make impactful changes. Psychologists must trust their training and expertise to identify psychology as a leadership profession. This workshop will provide illustrations of how psychology training translates into the skills required in leadership roles and how to help students develop these skills. Small group discussions will be used to help participants explore what causes they are passionate about pursuing, build relationships with mentors and allies, identify leadership and advocacy opportunities and activities, and build their advocacy and leadership skills. Small groups will report to the larger group to share strategies to integrate leadership and advocacy skills training into students’ current curricula. Finally, role plays will be used to practice « elevator talks, » delivering your message to decision-makers succinctly and with impact.
Learning Outcomes:
1. Identify psychological concepts that can be used for effective advocacy and leadership
2. Recognize how the skills learned during psychology training translate into effective advocacy and leadership skills in various settings including healthcare
3. Be aware of the gaps and limitations in psychology training and identify ways to further increase knowledge and skills related to advocacy and leadership
4. Recognize that psychologists have the skills to be advocates and leaders at various levels within organizations
5. Learn strategies of effective advocacy and leadership
6. Identify ways to train future psychologists in advocacy and leadership


Psychopharmacology for Clinicians: 2019 Update

Presented by: Morgan T. Sammons

Duration: Full Day (9:00 – 16:30)
Continuing Education Credits: 6
Sponsored by: Canadian Psychological Association

Target Audience: Clinicians and graduate students.
Skill/Difficulty Level: Intermediate
Workshop Description:
This 6-hour continuing education presentation will address recent developments in clinical psychopharmacology and how such developments affect the practice of psychologists. Newly introduced drugs will be covered along with a survey of agents in the following classes: antidepressants, anxiolytics, antipsychotics, mood stabilizers, and psychostimulants. Characteristics of commonly used drugs, their indications, mechanisms of action and common clinical uses will be discussed, along with techniques for combining pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatments. The evidence base supporting the use of common psychotropics will be addressed along with optimal treatment strategies.
Learning Outcomes:
1. Attendees will appreciate the most recent research regarding properties of frequently used pharmacological agents, including efficacy, side effects, and contraindications
2. Attendees will understand the latest evidence supporting the combination of drug and non-drug treatment for common mental disorders
3. Attendees will understand basics of clinical utilization of common psychotropic drugs, including initiation and discontinuation strategies and techniques for minimizing adverse side effects


Shifting Directions/Paradigms: Psychology in Action as a De-colonizing and Empowering Force

Presented by: Colleen MacQuarrie, Jessica McCutcheon, Karen L. Blair, Rhea A. Hoskin, Sobia F. Ali Faisal, Jeffrey Ansloos, Anusha Kassan

Duration: Full Day (9:00 – 16:30)
Continuing Education Credits: 6
Sponsored by: Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Issues (SOGII)

Target Audience: Graduate students, practitioners, researchers, clinicians, teachers/professors, and inter-sectional CPA members.
Skill/Difficulty Level: Intermediate
Workshop Description:
We are preparing an innovative way to learn, think, and feel about our work by curating a unique format that awakens our potential to transform ourselves, our work, and our world. This day long pre-conference workshop will invite artistic and scholarly work to inspire us to know and think differently about psychology. Together we will explore how we transform psychology into a deeply responsive anti-colonizing force. We problematize psychology’s colonial white supremacist process for normalizing western versions of humanity; entrenching racist, sexist, elitist practices as core epistemology which are then reified in research, therapy, and the classroom. Research, classrooms, and therapy can become powerful media to challenge a psychological status quo of colonized knowledge – resisting rather than upholding the erasure of experiences of Black and Indigenous peoples, and People of Colour (BIPOC) and LGBTQ2+ people. Creating transformative and empowering conditions in every realm of practice and being is essential for de-colonizing psychology. Rather than looking at the ‘margins,’ in an attempt to shift the focus we examine how the center cannot hold and perhaps was never there except in the stories we used to create a discipline in the first place. In this workshop we will collaboratively and creatively explore how to humbly commit to listening for directions from our communities, to honour their perspectives of truth, and to be able to hear what matters to them; in relationships with our communities is how we can de-colonize our research, training, and therapeutic processes. This workshop is curated by 4 CPA sections (Indigenous Peoples’ Psychology; SOGII; Counselling; and Section for Women and Psychology).
Learning Outcomes:
1. Deepen their understanding of Canadian contexts for psychological praxis by exploring the significance of intersecting identity statuses, specifically: indigeneity, gender, and sexuality
2. Collaboratively problematize existing psychological praxis using the tools of intersectional analysis of oppressions, specifically: indigeneity, gender, and sexuality.
3. Gain competency in how to continue a process of ongoing de-colonization of their psychological praxis
4. Gain skills in problematization of how power operates within our research, teaching, clinical practice, and community work
5. Reflect and evaluate empowering praxis associated with research, classroom, community, and clinical contexts
6. Articulate how their academic activism can be a tool for their work and community collaboration